Dictionary.com
definitions
  • synonyms

appal

[uh-pawl]
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
verb (used with object), ap·palled, ap·pal·ling.
  1. appall.

appall

or ap·pal

[uh-pawl]
verb (used with object)
  1. to fill or overcome with horror, consternation, or fear; dismay: He was appalled by the damage from the fire. I am appalled at your mistakes.

Origin of appall

1275–1325; Middle English < Middle French ap(p)allir to grow or make pale, equivalent to a- a-5 + pal(l)ir in same sense; see pale1

Synonyms

See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
horrify, daunt. See frighten.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for appalled

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • But while she spoke as if she were shocked and appalled, her eyes belied her words.

    The Armourer's Prentices

    Charlotte M. Yonge

  • The girl was appalled by the mercilessness of a destiny that had so outraged right.

    Within the Law

    Marvin Dana

  • The utter loneliness behind him and ahead of him appalled him in its contrast to this.

  • The eventuality he had not foreseen had appalled him as a humane man and a fond husband.

    The Secret Agent

    Joseph Conrad

  • He was appalled by the black heart that lay bare before him.

    Night and Morning, Complete

    Edward Bulwer-Lytton


British Dictionary definitions for appalled

appal

US appall

verb -pals, -palling or -palled or US -palls, -palling or -palled
  1. (tr) to fill with horror; shock or dismay

Word Origin

C14: from Old French appalir to turn pale
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for appalled

adj.

1570s, "enfeebled;" c.1600, "dismayed;" past participle adjective from appall.

appall

v.

also appal, early 14c., "to fade;" c.1400, "to grow pale," from Old French apalir "become or make pale," from a- "to" (see ad-) + palir "grow pale," from Latin pallere (see pallor). Meaning "cause dismay or shock," is 1530s. Related: Appalled; appalling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper