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condescending

[kon-duh-sen-ding] /ˌkɒn dəˈsɛn dɪŋ/
adjective
1.
showing or implying a usually patronizing descent from dignity or superiority:
They resented the older neighbors' condescending cordiality.
Origin of condescending
1630-1640
First recorded in 1630-40; condescend + -ing2
Related forms
condescendingly, adverb
noncondescending, adjective
noncondescendingly, adverb
noncondescendingness, noun
uncondescending, adjective
uncondescendingly, adverb
Synonyms
patronizing, disdainful, supercilious.

condescend

[kon-duh-send] /ˌkɒn dəˈsɛnd/
verb (used without object)
1.
to behave as if one is conscious of descending from a superior position, rank, or dignity.
2.
to stoop or deign to do something:
He would not condescend to misrepresent the facts.
3.
to put aside one's dignity or superiority voluntarily and assume equality with one regarded as inferior:
He condescended to their intellectual level in order to be understood.
4.
Obsolete.
  1. to yield.
  2. to assent.
Origin
1300-50; Middle English condescenden < Late Latin condēscendere (see con-, descend); replacing Middle English condescendre < Middle French
Related forms
condescender, condescendent, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for condescending
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He recalled his condescending tone to her, and recollected his anxiety about the jar.

  • He treated the subject as he did the rival, with condescending toleration.

    Thankful's Inheritance Joseph C. Lincoln
  • The answer, delivered by Mr. Dickens, was condescending and explanatory.

    Cap'n Warren's Wards Joseph C. Lincoln
  • Kind of top-lofty and condescending, but that's the fault of her bringing-up.

    The Rise of Roscoe Paine Joseph C. Lincoln
  • "I'll give you an extra penny," said his lordship, condescending to bargain.

    Aunt Rachel David Christie Murray
British Dictionary definitions for condescending

condescending

/ˌkɒndɪˈsɛndɪŋ/
adjective
1.
showing or implying condescension by stooping to the level of one's inferiors, esp in a patronizing way
Derived Forms
condescendingly, adverb

condescend

/ˌkɒndɪˈsɛnd/
verb (intransitive)
1.
to act graciously towards another or others regarded as being on a lower level; behave patronizingly
2.
to do something that one regards as below one's dignity
Word Origin
C14: from Church Latin condēscendere to stoop, condescend, from Latin dēscendere to descend
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for condescending
adj.

1707, present participle adjective from condescend. Originally in a positive sense (of God, the Savior, etc.) until late 18c. Related: Condescendingly (1650s).

condescend

adj.

mid-14c., "to yield deferentially," from Old French condescendere (14c.) "to agree, consent, give in, yield," from Late Latin condescendere "to let oneself down," from Latin com- "together" (see com-) + descendere "descend" (see descend). Sense of "to sink willingly to equal terms with inferiors" is from mid-15c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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