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darksome

[dahrk-suh m] /ˈdɑrk səm/
adjective
1.
dark; darkish.
Origin of darksome
1520-1530
First recorded in 1520-30; dark + -some1
Related forms
darksomeness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for darksome
Historical Examples
  • Inez followed him into this darksome hole, and the wall closed behind them.

    Fair Margaret H. Rider Haggard
  • The daylight came down the hatch, but for all that the cabin was darksome.

    The Frozen Pirate W. Clark Russell
  • She swore it in that shadowy spot—in that dread and darksome hour.

    The Quadroon Mayne Reid
  • She was looking at me, and not at the darksome place about her.

    The Millionaire Baby

    Anna Katharine Green
  • Sweet-mouthed she was, and fair he wist; And again in the darksome wood they kissed.

    Poems by the Way William Morris
  • The way of the wicked is darksome; they know not her into the wilderness, and I will speak to where they fall.

  • The wayfarer entered a darksome passage that led to an inner court.

    Marse Henry (Vol. 2) Henry Watterson
  • "Come in," he whispered, and all four of them passed into a darksome passage.

    Lysbeth H. Rider Haggard
  • The way of the wicked is darksome: they know not where they fall.

  • Leisure and calm in groves, and cooling vales;Grottoes and babbling brooks, and darksome dales.

British Dictionary definitions for darksome

darksome

/ˈdɑːksəm/
adjective
1.
(literary) dark or darkish
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Value for darksome

15
16
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