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implacable

[im-plak-uh-buh l, -pley-kuh-] /ɪmˈplæk ə bəl, -ˈpleɪ kə-/
adjective
1.
not to be appeased, mollified, or pacified; inexorable:
an implacable enemy.
Origin of implacable
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English < Latin implācābilis. See im-2, placable
Related forms
implacability, implacableness, noun
implacably, adverb
Synonyms
unappeasable, unbending, merciless. See inflexible.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for implacable
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He has a will of iron, dauntless resolution, and an implacable temper.

    Cord and Creese James de Mille
  • A god lies in wait on the road to the other world who is implacable to the unmarried.

    Folkways William Graham Sumner
  • implacable fate does not tire to persecute me,” he replied.

    Other People's Money Emile Gaboriau
  • Why was I so indulgent towards Carmelo and so implacable to Rosario?

    Diversions in Sicily H. Festing Jones
  • These are just as bitter, venomous, and implacable to-day as on the day when Gen. Grant's term of office expired.

British Dictionary definitions for implacable

implacable

/ɪmˈplækəbəl/
adjective
1.
incapable of being placated or pacified; unappeasable
2.
inflexible; intractable
Derived Forms
implacability, implacableness, noun
implacably, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Contemporary definitions for implacable
adjective

unable to be appeased; irreconcilable

Word Origin

Latin im- + placare 'to appease'

Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
Copyright © 2003-2014 Dictionary.com, LLC
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Word Origin and History for implacable
adj.

early 15c., from Old French implacable, from Latin implacabilis "unappeasable," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + placabilis "easily appeased" (see placate). Related: Implacably.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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