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imprest1

[im-prest]
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noun
  1. an advance of money; loan.
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Origin of imprest1

1560–70; probably noun use of obsolete v. imprest to advance money to < Italian imprestare < Latin im- im-1 + praestāre to be responsible for (prae- pre- + stāre to stand, influenced in sense by praes, stem praed- guarantor, one acting as surety

imprest2

[im-prest]
verb Archaic.
  1. simple past tense and past participle of impress1.
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imprest3

verb Archaic.
  1. simple past tense and past participle of impress2.
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impress1

[verb im-pres; noun im-pres]
verb (used with object), im·pressed or (Archaic) im·prest; im·pres·sing.
  1. to affect deeply or strongly in mind or feelings; influence in opinion: He impressed us as a sincere young man.
  2. to fix deeply or firmly on the mind or memory, as ideas or facts: to impress the importance of honesty on a child.
  3. to urge, as something to be remembered or done: She impressed the need for action on them.
  4. to press (a thing) into or on something.
  5. to impose a particular characteristic or quality upon (something): The painter impressed his love of garish colors upon the landscape.
  6. to produce (a mark, figure, etc.) by pressure; stamp; imprint: The king impressed his seal on the melted wax.
  7. to apply with pressure, so as to leave a mark.
  8. to subject to or mark by pressure with something.
  9. to furnish with a mark, figure, etc., by or as if by stamping.
  10. Electricity. to produce (a voltage) or cause (a voltage) to appear or be produced on a conductor, circuit, etc.
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verb (used without object), im·pressed or (Archaic) im·prest; im·pres·sing.
  1. to create a favorable impression; draw attention to oneself: a child's behavior intended to impress.
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noun
  1. the act of impressing.
  2. a mark made by or as by pressure; stamp; imprint.
  3. a distinctive character or effect imparted: writings that bear the impress of a strong personality.
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Origin of impress1

1325–75; Middle English < Latin impressus past participle of imprimere to press into or upon, impress, equivalent to im- im-1 + pressus past participle of premere (combining form -primere) to press1; see print
Related formsim·press·er, noun

Synonyms

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1. move, sway, disturb; persuade.

impress2

[verb im-pres; noun im-pres]
verb (used with object), im·pressed or (Archaic) im·prest; im·pres·sing.
  1. to press or force into public service, as sailors.
  2. to seize or take for public use.
  3. to take or persuade into service by forceful arguments: The neighbors were impressed into helping the family move.
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noun
  1. impressment.
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Origin of impress2

First recorded in 1590–1600; im-1 + press2
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for imprest

Historical Examples


British Dictionary definitions for imprest

imprest

noun
  1. a fund of cash from which a department or other unit pays incidental expenses, topped up periodically from central funds
  2. mainly British an advance from government funds for the performance of some public business or service
  3. British (formerly) an advance payment of wages to a sailor or soldier
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Word Origin

C16: probably from Italian imprestare to lend, from Latin in- towards + praestāre to pay, from praestō at hand; see presto

impress1

verb (ɪmˈprɛs) (tr)
  1. to make an impression on; have a strong, lasting, or favourable effect onI am impressed by your work
  2. to produce (an imprint, etc) by pressure in or on (something)to impress a seal in wax; to impress wax with a seal
  3. (often foll by on) to stress (something to a person); urge; emphasizeto impress the danger of a situation on someone
  4. to exert pressure on; press
  5. electronics to apply (a voltage) to a circuit or device
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noun (ˈɪmprɛs)
  1. the act or an instance of impressing
  2. a mark, imprint, or effect produced by impressing
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Derived Formsimpresser, nounimpressible, adjective

Word Origin

C14: from Latin imprimere to press into, imprint, from premere to press 1

impress2

verb (ɪmˈprɛs)
  1. to commandeer or coerce (men or things) into government service; press-gang
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noun (ˈɪmprɛs)
  1. the act of commandeering or coercing into government service; impressment
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Word Origin

C16: see im- in- ², press ²
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for imprest

impress

v.

late 14c., "have a strong effect on the mind or heart," from Latin impressus, past participle of imprimere "press into or upon, stamp," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + premere "to press" (see press (v.1)). Literal sense of "to apply with pressure, make a permanent image in, indent, imprint" is from early 15c. in English. Sense of "to levy for military service" is from 1590s, a meaning more from press (v.2). Related: Impressed; impressing.

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impress

n.

"act of impressing," also "characteristic mark," 1590s, from impress (v.).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper