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methodology

[meth-uh-dol-uh-jee] /ˌmɛθ əˈdɒl ə dʒi/
noun, plural methodologies.
1.
a set or system of methods, principles, and rules for regulating a given discipline, as in the arts or sciences.
2.
Philosophy.
  1. the underlying principles and rules of organization of a philosophical system or inquiry procedure.
  2. the study of the principles underlying the organization of the various sciences and the conduct of scientific inquiry.
3.
Education. a branch of pedagogics dealing with analysis and evaluation of subjects to be taught and of the methods of teaching them.
Origin of methodology
1790-1800
From the New Latin word methodologia, dating back to 1790-1800. See method, -o-, -logy
Related forms
methodological
[meth-uh-dl-oj-i-kuh l] /ˌmɛθ ə dlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl/ (Show IPA),
adjective
methodologically, adverb
methodologist, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for methodological
Historical Examples
  • Progress, then, is not a "natural" fact, but a methodological one.

    A Grammar of Freethought Chapman Cohen
  • Under such circumstances it is utterly impossible from a methodological standpoint to regard them otherwise than identical.

    Teutonic Mythology, Vol. 1 of 3 Viktor Rydberg, Ph.D.
  • Examine the methodological relations between Definition, Classification and Nomenclature.

    Logic Carveth Read
  • Hence these principles carry their recommendation directly in themselves, and not merely as methodological devices.

  • A big part of the difference is methodological, rather than inherent in the nature of the phenomena themselves.

    The Value of Money Benjamin M. Anderson, Jr.
  • In Schumpeter's view, the division between statics and dynamics is much more than methodological.

    The Value of Money Benjamin M. Anderson, Jr.
  • If they turn out to be false, candour compels us to call them methodological fictions; but they continue in use.

  • The case of methodological assumptions is more difficult and instructive, and is usually misconceived.

  • That this is a methodological device no one denies, but so are most of the other distinctions that we frame.

    A Grammar of Freethought Chapman Cohen
  • But this, quite obviously, is merely a methodological precept, not a law of Nature.

British Dictionary definitions for methodological

methodology

/ˌmɛθəˈdɒlədʒɪ/
noun (pl) -gies
1.
the system of methods and principles used in a particular discipline
2.
the branch of philosophy concerned with the science of method and procedure
Derived Forms
methodological (ˌmɛθədəˈlɒdʒɪkəl) adjective
methodologically, adverb
methodologist, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for methodological
adj.

1828, from methodology + -ical. Related: Methodologically.

methodology

n.

1800, from French méthodologie or directly from Modern Latin methodologia; see method + -ology.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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