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Platonic

[pluh-ton-ik, pley-] /pləˈtɒn ɪk, pleɪ-/
adjective
1.
of, relating to, or characteristic of Plato or his doctrines:
the Platonic philosophy of ideal forms.
2.
pertaining to, involving, or characterized by Platonic love as a striving toward love of spiritual or ideal beauty.
3.
(usually lowercase) purely spiritual; free from sensual desire, especially in a relationship between two persons of the opposite sex.
4.
(usually lowercase) feeling or professing platonic love:
He insisted that he was completely platonic in his admiration.
Origin of Platonic
1525-1535
1525-35; < Latin Platōnicus < Greek Platōnikós, equivalent to Platōn-, stem of Plátōn Plato + -ikos, -ic
Related forms
Platonically, adverb
anti-Platonic, adjective
anti-Platonically, adverb
post-Platonic, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for Platonic
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • His philosophy was Platonic, or rather the bent of his mind was Platonic.

  • The Menexenus has more the character of a rhetorical exercise than any other of the Platonic works.

    Menexenus Plato
  • There is a twofold difficulty in apprehending this aspect of the Platonic writings.

    Phaedrus Plato
  • And there he would sing to Dulcinea, his Platonic and only love.

    The Story of Don Quixote

    Arvid Paulson, Clayton Edwards, and Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
  • The style and plan of the Timaeus differ greatly from that of any other of the Platonic dialogues.

    Timaeus Plato
British Dictionary definitions for Platonic

Platonic

/pləˈtɒnɪk/
adjective
1.
of or relating to Plato or his teachings
2.
(often not capital) free from physical desire: Platonic love
Derived Forms
Platonically, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for Platonic
adj.

1530s, "of or pertaining to Greek philosopher Plato" (429 B.C.E.-c.347 B.C.E.), from Latin Platonicus, from Greek Platonikos. The name is Greek Platon, properly "broad-shouldered" (from platys "broad;" see plaice (n.)). His original name was Aristocles. The meaning "love free of sensual desire" (1630s), which the word usually carries nowadays, is a Renaissance notion; it is based on Plato's writings in "Symposium" about the kind of interest Socrates took in young men, which originally had no reference to women. Related: Platonically.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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