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sidetrack

[sahyd-trak] /ˈsaɪdˌtræk/
verb (used with or without object)
1.
to move from the main track to a siding, as a train.
2.
to move or distract from the main subject or course.
noun
3.
any railroad track, other than a siding, auxiliary to the main track.
Origin of sidetrack
1825-1835
An Americanism dating back to 1825-35; side1 + track
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for sidetracked
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • However, she did not intend to be sidetracked or discouraged.

    Cap'n Warren's Wards Joseph C. Lincoln
  • It is a short ride to where the cars are sidetracked, waiting.

    The Last Woman

    Ross Beeckman
  • The train was sidetracked here and there, and dragged along at a slow pace.

    Eben Holden Irving Bacheller
  • Stopped at every station and sidetracked for all the regular trains.

    Back Home Eugene Wood
  • Merry returned to the rehearsal lines from which they had sidetracked.

British Dictionary definitions for sidetracked

sidetrack

/ˈsaɪdˌtræk/
verb
1.
to distract or be distracted from a main subject or topic
noun
2.
(US & Canadian) a railway siding
3.
the act or an instance of sidetracking; digression
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for sidetracked

sidetrack

n.

also side-track, "railway siding," 1835, from side (adj.) + track (n.). The verb meaning "to move (a train car) onto a sidetrack" is from 1874; figurative sense of "to divert from the main purpose" is attested from 1881. Related: Sidetracked.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for sidetracked

19
20
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