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about

[ uh-bout ]
/ əˈbaʊt /
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preposition

adverb

adjective

moving around; astir: He was up and about while the rest of us still slept.
in existence; current; prevalent: Chicken pox is about.

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“Evoke” and “invoke” both derive from the same Latin root “vocāre.”

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Origin of about

before 900; Middle English aboute(n), Old English abūtan, onbūtan on the outside of (a-a-1 + būtan outside (see but1, but2), equivalent to b(e) by1 + ūtan), cognate with Gothic utana,Old Norse, Old Saxon ūtan,Old Frisian ūta,Old High German ūzan(a) outside; see out; cf. above, abaft for formation
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use about in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for about

about
/ (əˈbaʊt) /

preposition

adverb

adjective

(predicative) active; astir after sleepup and about
(predicative) in existence, current, or in circulationthere aren't many about nowadays

Word Origin for about

Old English abūtan, onbūtan on the outside of, around, from on + būtan outside
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with about

about

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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