ac

Ac

Chemistry.
  1. acetate.
  2. acetyl.

Ac

Symbol, Chemistry.
  1. actinium.

AC

  1. Real Estate. air conditioning.
  2. Electricity. alternating current.

ac-

  1. variant of ad- before c and qu: accede; acquire.

-ac

  1. variant of -ic after Greek noun stems ending in i: cardiac; maniac.

Origin of -ac

< Latin -acus < Greek -akos

a.c.

1
  1. (in prescriptions) before meals.

Origin of a.c.

1
From the Latin word ante cibum

a.c.

2
  1. Real Estate. air conditioning.
  2. Electricity. alternating current.

A.C.

1
  1. before Christ.

Origin of A.C.

1
From the Latin word ante Christum

A.C.

2
  1. Real Estate. air conditioning.
  2. Electricity. alternating current.
  3. Army Corps.
  4. Athletic Club.

A/C

or a/c

  1. Bookkeeping.
    1. account.
    2. account current.
  2. Real Estate. air conditioning.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for ac

Contemporary Examples of ac

  • The conference room suddenly felt very warm, and I wondered if the AC had gone out.

    The Daily Beast logo
    I Shot Bin Laden

    Elliot Ackerman

    November 16, 2014

  • Ghanaian soccer player Michael Essien, who plays for AC Milan, has been the subject of what borders on fear mongering.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Europe’s Hidden Ebola Cases

    Barbie Latza Nadeau

    October 15, 2014

  • I said to the guy, “Why do they have to turn on the AC so high.”

    The Daily Beast logo
    Jamaica, We Have a Dogsled Team

    Allen St. John

    March 25, 2014

  • Much debate centered on the necessary current and the current type (AC versus DC) to assure a rapid and painless death.

    The Daily Beast logo
    The Death Penalty’s Gruesome Truth

    Kent Sepkowitz

    February 6, 2014

  • Americans bought 1.5 billion cans of tuna last year, according to AC Nielsen data.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Honey, They Shrunk the Tuna!

    William Sherman

    July 29, 2010

Historical Examples of ac


British Dictionary definitions for ac

ac

the internet domain name for
  1. Ascension Island

Ac

the chemical symbol for
  1. actinium

AC

abbreviation for
  1. alternating currentCompare DC
  2. ante Christum
  3. Air Corps
  4. athletic club
  5. Companion of the Order of Australia
  6. appellation d'origine contrôlée: the highest French wine classification; indicates that the wine meets strict requirements concerning area of production, strength, etcSee VDQS, vin de pays, vin de table
  7. Aelodau'r Cynulliad: Member of the Assembly (that is, the National Assembly of Wales)

Word Origin for AC

(for sense 2) Latin: before Christ

a/c

abbreviation for
  1. account
  2. account current

A/C

abbreviation for
  1. (in Canada) Air Commodore

a.c.

abbreviation for
  1. (in prescriptions) ante cibum

Word Origin for a.c.

Latin: before meals
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for ac

AC

abbreviation of air conditioning, by 1966.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

ac in Medicine

ac

abbr.
  1. ante cibum (before a meal)

Ac

  1. The symbol for the elementactinium

ac-

pref.
  1. Variant ofad-
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

ac in Science

Ac

  1. The symbol for actinium.

AC

  1. Abbreviation of alternating current

actinium

[ăk-tĭnē-əm]
Ac
  1. A silvery-white, highly radioactive metallic element of the actinide series that is found in uranium ores. It is about 150 times more radioactive than radium and is used as a source of alpha rays and neutrons. Its most stable isotope has a half-life of about 22 years. Atomic number 89; melting point 1,050°C (1,922°F); boiling point (estimated) 3,200°C (5,792°F); specific gravity (calculated) 10.07; valence 3. See Periodic Table.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.