accompany

[uh-kuhm-puh-nee]
See more synonyms for accompany on Thesaurus.com
verb (used with object), ac·com·pa·nied, ac·com·pa·ny·ing.
  1. to go along or in company with; join in action: to accompany a friend on a walk.
  2. to be or exist in association or company with: Thunder accompanies lightning.
  3. to put in company with; cause to be or go along; associate (usually followed by with): He accompanied his speech with gestures.
  4. Music. to play or sing an accompaniment to or for.
verb (used without object), ac·com·pa·nied, ac·com·pa·ny·ing.
  1. to provide the musical accompaniment.

Origin of accompany

1425–75; late Middle English accompanye < Middle French accompagnier. See ac-, company
Related formsnon·ac·com·pa·ny·ing, adjectivere·ac·com·pa·ny, verb (used with object), re·ac·com·pa·nied, re·ac·com·pa·ny·ing.well-ac·com·pa·nied, adjective

Synonym study

1. Accompany, attend, convoy, escort mean to go along with someone (or something). To accompany is to go along as an associate on equal terms: to accompany a friend on a shopping trip. Attend implies going along with, usually to render service or perform duties: to attend one's employer on a business trip. To convoy is to accompany (especially ships) with an armed guard for protection: to convoy a fleet of merchant vessels. To escort is to accompany in order to protect, guard, honor, or show courtesy: to escort a visiting dignitary.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for accompanying

concomitant, with

Examples from the Web for accompanying

Contemporary Examples of accompanying

Historical Examples of accompanying

  • "Good-night, captain," said the superintendent, accompanying him to the door.

    Brave and Bold

    Horatio Alger

  • There is an interesting study in the accompanying illustration.

    Flying Machines

    W.J. Jackman and Thos. H. Russell

  • All the details of construction are shown in the accompanying illustration.

    Flying Machines

    W.J. Jackman and Thos. H. Russell

  • With accompanying gen.: wges heard, strong in battle, 887; dat.

    Beowulf

    Unknown

  • With accompanying gen.: wīges heard, strong in battle, 887; dat.

    Beowulf

    Unknown


British Dictionary definitions for accompanying

accompany

verb -nies, -nying or -nied
  1. (tr) to go along with, so as to be in company with or escort
  2. (tr foll by with) to supplementthe food is accompanied with a very hot mango pickle
  3. (tr) to occur, coexist, or be associated with
  4. to provide a musical accompaniment for (a performer)
Derived Formsaccompanier, noun

Word Origin for accompany

C15: from Old French accompaignier, from compaing companion 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for accompanying

accompany

v.

early 15c., "to be in company with," from Middle French accompagner, from Old French acompaignier (12c.) "take as a companion," from à "to" (see ad-) + compaignier, from compaign (see companion). Related: Accompanied; accompanying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper