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admiral

[ ad-mer-uhl ]
/ ˈæd mər əl /
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noun
the commander in chief of a fleet.
a naval officer of the highest rank.
a naval officer of a high rank: the grades in the U.S. Navy are fleet admiral, admiral, vice-admiral, and rear admiral.
Obsolete. the flagship of an admiral.
British. a master who directs a fishing fleet.
any of several often brightly colored butterflies of the family Nymphalidae, as Vanessa atalanta(red admiral ).
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Origin of admiral

1175–1225; Middle English, variant of amiral<Old French <Arabic amīr al commander of the; -d-<Medieval Latin admīrābilis mundī for Arabic amīr al-mu'minīn commander of the faithful; or with replacement of a-5 by ad-, as in administer

OTHER WORDS FROM admiral

ad·mi·ral·ship, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use admiral in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for admiral

admiral
/ (ˈædmərəl) /

noun
the supreme commander of a fleet or navy
Also called: admiral of the fleet, fleet admiral a naval officer of the highest rank, equivalent to general of the army or field marshal
a senior naval officer entitled to fly his own flagSee also rear admiral, vice admiral
mainly British the master of a fishing fleet
any of various nymphalid butterflies, esp the red admiral or white admiral

Derived forms of admiral

admiralship, noun

Word Origin for admiral

C13: amyral, from Old French amiral emir, and from Medieval Latin admīrālis (the spelling with d probably influenced by admīrābilis admirable); both from Arabic amīr emir, commander, esp in the phrase amīr-al commander of, as in amīr-al-bahr commander of the sea
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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