admit

[ ad-mit ]
/ ædˈmɪt /

verb (used with object), ad·mit·ted, ad·mit·ting.

verb (used without object), ad·mit·ted, ad·mit·ting.

to permit entrance; give access: This door admits to the garden.
to permit the possibility of something; allow (usually followed by of): The contract admits of no other interpretation.

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Origin of admit

1375–1425; < Latin admittere, equivalent to ad- ad- + mittere to send, let go; replacing late Middle English amitte, with a- a-5 (instead of ad-) < Middle French amettre < Latin, as above

synonym study for admit

6. See acknowledge.

OTHER WORDS FROM admit

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for admitting

British Dictionary definitions for admitting

admit
/ (ədˈmɪt) /

verb -mits, -mitting or -mitted (mainly tr)

(may take a clause as object) to confess or acknowledge (a crime, mistake, etc)
(may take a clause as object) to concede (the truth or validity of something)
to allow to enter; let in
(foll by to) to allow participation (in) or the right to be part (of)to admit to the profession
(when intr, foll by of) to allow (of); leave room (for)
(intr) to give accessthe door admits onto the lawn

Word Origin for admit

C14: from Latin admittere to let come or go to, from ad- to + mittere to send
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012