affection

1
[ uh-fek-shuhn ]
/ əˈfɛk ʃən /

noun

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DO YOU KNOW THIS VOCABULARY FROM "THE HANDMAID'S TALE"?

"The Handmaid's Tale" was required reading for many of us in school. Everyone else has probably watched the very popular and addictive TV show. Do you remember this vocabulary from the book, and do you know what these terms mean?
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decorum

Origin of affection

1
1200–50; Middle English < Old French < Latin affectiōn- (stem of affectiō) disposition or state of mind or body; see affect1, -ion

OTHER WORDS FROM affection

af·fec·tion·less, adjective

Definition for affection (2 of 2)

affection2
[ uh-fek-shuh n ]
/ əˈfɛk ʃən /

noun Obsolete.

Origin of affection

2
First recorded in 1525–35; affect2 + -ion
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for affection

British Dictionary definitions for affection

affection
/ (əˈfɛkʃən) /

noun

a feeling of fondness or tenderness for a person or thing; attachment
(often plural) emotion, feeling, or sentimentto play on a person's affections
pathol any disease or pathological condition
psychol any form of mental functioning that involves emotionSee also affect 1 (def. 2)
the act of affecting or the state of being affected
archaic inclination or disposition

Derived forms of affection

affectional, adjective

Word Origin for affection

C13: from Latin affectiōn- disposition, from afficere to affect 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for affection

affection
[ ə-fĕkshən ]

n.

A tender feeling toward another; fondness.
A bodily condition; disease.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.