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anvil

[ an-vil ]
/ ˈæn vɪl /
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noun
a heavy iron block with a smooth face, frequently of steel, on which metals, usually heated until soft, are hammered into desired shapes.
anything having a similar form or use.
the fixed jaw in certain measuring instruments.
Also called anvil cloud, anvil top .Meteorology. incus (def. 2).
a musical percussion instrument having steel bars that are struck with a wooden or metal beater.
Anatomy. incus (def. 1).
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Origin of anvil

before 900; Middle English anvelt, anfelt,Old English anfilt(e), anfealt; cognate with Middle Dutch anvilte,Old High German anafalz.See on, felt2
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use anvil in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for anvil

anvil
/ (ˈænvɪl) /

noun
a heavy iron or steel block on which metals are hammered during forging
any part having a similar shape or function, such as the lower part of a telegraph key
the fixed jaw of a measurement device against which the piece to be measured is held
anatomy the nontechnical name for incus

Word Origin for anvil

Old English anfealt; related to Old High German anafalz, Middle Dutch anvilte; see on, felt ²
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for anvil

anvil
[ ănvĭl ]

n.
incus
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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