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approbative

[ ap-ruh-bey-tiv, uh-proh-buh- ]
/ ˈæp rəˌbeɪ tɪv, əˈproʊ bə- /
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adjective
approving; expressing approbation.
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Also ap·pro·ba·to·ry [uh-proh-buh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee]. /əˈproʊ bəˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/.

Origin of approbative

From the Medieval Latin word approbātīvus, dating back to 1605–15. See approbate, -ive

OTHER WORDS FROM approbative

ap·pro·ba·tive·ness, nounsub·ap·pro·ba·tive, adjectivesub·ap·pro·ba·tive·ness, nounsub·ap·pro·ba·to·ry, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use approbative in a sentence

  • As she leaned forward listening, with her lips slightly parted, Margaret gave an unconscious little approbative nod of the head.

    The Stillwater Tragedy|Thomas Bailey Aldrich
  • Bartrow looked him up and down with a smile which was grimly approbative.

    The Helpers|Francis Lynde
  • And the approbative shouts of his half-intoxicated auditors filled his simple soul with delight and pride.

    Almayer's Folly|Joseph Conrad
  • A small victory thus won acts on them like the good dinner to the Alimentive man, or flattery to the Approbative person.

    The Psychology of Salesmanship|William Walker Atkinson
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