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bandore

[ ban-dawr, -dohr, ban-dawr, -dohr ]
/ bænˈdɔr, -ˈdoʊr, ˈbæn dɔr, -doʊr /
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noun
an obsolete musical instrument resembling the guitar.
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Also ban·do·ra [ban-dawr-uh, -dohr-uh] /bænˈdɔr ə, -ˈdoʊr ə/ .
Also called pan·do·ra [pan-dawr-uh, -dohr-uh], /pænˈdɔr ə, -ˈdoʊr ə/, pan·dore [pan-dawr, -dohr, pan-dawr, -dohr], /pænˈdɔr, -ˈdoʊr, ˈpæn dɔr, -doʊr/, pan·dou·ra [pan-door-uh], /pænˈdʊər ə/, pan·dure [pan-jer, pan-door, -dyoor] /ˈpæn dʒər, pænˈdʊər, -ˈdyʊər/ .

Origin of bandore

First recorded in 1560–70; earlier bandurion, from Spanish bandurria, from Latin pandūra, from Greek pandoûra “three-stringed musical instrument”
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use bandore in a sentence

  • Banjo seems to be derived from bandore or bandurria, modern French and Spanish forms of tambour, respectively.

    The American Language|Henry L. Mencken

British Dictionary definitions for bandore

bandore
/ (bænˈdɔː, ˈbændɔː) /

noun
a 16th-century plucked musical instrument resembling a lute but larger and fitted with seven pairs of metal stringsAlso called: pandore, pandora

Word Origin for bandore

C16: from Spanish bandurria, from Late Latin pandūra three-stringed instrument, from Greek pandoura
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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