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banter

[ban-ter]
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noun
  1. an exchange of light, playful, teasing remarks; good-natured raillery.
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verb (used with object)
  1. to address with banter; chaff.
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verb (used without object)
  1. to use banter.
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Origin of banter

First recorded in 1660–70; origin uncertain
Related formsban·ter·er, nounban·ter·ing·ly, adverbout·ban·ter, verb (used with object)un·ban·ter·ing, adjectiveun·ban·ter·ing·ly, adverb

Synonyms

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1. badinage, joking, jesting, pleasantry, persiflage. 2. tease, twit; ridicule, deride, mock.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for bantering

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • Now and then, he laughed in a merry way, as if he were bantering her out of something.

    To be Read at Dusk

    Charles Dickens

  • This bantering is most pointed if we assume that Rosaline was dark rather than fair.

  • But when the last case had been taken out, Max dropped his bantering manner.

    K

    Mary Roberts Rinehart

  • Gilbert's voice had changed from its bantering note to a note of resolve.

    Changing Winds

    St. John G. Ervine

  • She laughed with an affectionate air, and spoke to him in a friendly, bantering way.

    His Masterpiece

    Emile Zola


British Dictionary definitions for bantering

banter

verb
  1. to speak to or tease lightly or jokingly
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noun
  1. light, teasing, or joking language or repartee
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Derived Formsbanterer, noun

Word Origin

C17: of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for bantering

banter

v.

1670s, origin uncertain; said by Swift to be a word from London street slang. Related: Bantered; bantering. The noun is from 1680s.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper