banding

[ ban-ding ]
/ ˈbæn dɪŋ /
||

noun Furniture.

decorative inlay, as for bordering or paneling a piece, composed of strips of wood contrasting in grain or color with the principal wood of the surface.

Nearby words

  1. bandgap,
  2. bandh,
  3. bandicoot,
  4. bandido,
  5. bandinelli,
  6. bandit,
  7. bandito,
  8. banditry,
  9. banditti,
  10. bandjarmasin

Origin of banding

First recorded in 1730–40; band2 + -ing1

band

1
[ band ]
/ bænd /

noun

a company of persons or, sometimes, animals or things, joined, acting, or functioning together; aggregation; party; troop: a band of protesters.
Music.
  1. a group of instrumentalists playing music of a specialized type: rock band; calypso band; mariachi band.
  2. a musical group, usually employing brass, percussion, and often woodwind instruments, that plays especially for marching or open-air performances.
  3. big band.
  4. dance band.
a division of a nomadic tribe; a group of individuals who move and camp together and subsist by hunting and gathering.
a group of persons living outside the law: a renegade band.

verb (used with object)

to unite in a troop, company, or confederacy.

verb (used without object)

to unite; confederate (often followed by together): They banded together to oust the chairman.

Origin of band

1
1480–90; < Middle French bande < Italian banda; cognate with Late Latin bandum < Germanic; akin to Gothic bandwa standard, band2, band3, bend1, bond1

SYNONYMS FOR band

Synonym study

1. See company.

band

2
[ band ]
/ bænd /

noun

verb (used with object)

to mark, decorate, or furnish with a band or bands.

Origin of band

2
1480–90; < Middle French; Old French bende < Germanic; compare Old High German binta fillet. See bind, band1

Related formsband·er, nounband·less, adjective

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for banding


British Dictionary definitions for banding

banding

/ (ˈbændɪŋ) /

noun

British the practice of grouping schoolchildren according to ability to ensure a balanced intake at different levels of ability to secondary school

band

1
/ (bænd) /

noun

verb

(usually foll by together) to unite; assemble

Word Origin for band

C15: from French bande probably from Old Provençal banda of Germanic origin; compare Gothic bandwa sign, banner

band

2
/ (bænd) /

noun

verb (tr)

to fasten or mark with a band
US and Canadian to ring (a bird)See ring 1 (def. 22)

Word Origin for band

C15: from Old French bende, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German binda fillet; see band ³

band

3
/ (bænd) /

noun

Word Origin for band

C13: from Old Norse band; related to Old High German bant fetter; see bend 1, bond

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for banding
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for banding

banding

[ băndĭng ]

n.

The differential staining of metaphase chromosomes in cultured cells to reveal their characteristic patterns of stripes in order to identify individual chromosome pairs.

band

[ bănd ]

n.

An appliance or a part of an apparatus that encircles or binds a part of the body.
A cordlike tissue that connects or that holds bodily structures together.
A chromatically, structurally, or functionally differentiated strip or stripe in or on an organism.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for banding

band

[ bănd ]

A specific range of electromagnetic wavelengths or frequencies, as those used in radio broadcasting.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with banding

band

see on the bandwagon; to beat the band.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.