definitions
  • synonyms

belt

[ belt ]
/ bɛlt /
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SEE MORE SYNONYMS FOR belt ON THESAURUS.COM

noun

verb (used with object)

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RELATED WORDS

ring, string, ribbon, strap, region, zone, smash, bat, sock, clobber, smack, slam, whip, wallop, slug, bash, girdle, cincture, sash, cummerbund

Nearby words

belowdecks, belowground, belsen, belsey operation, belshazzar, belt, belt bag, belt down, belt drive, belt highway, belt line

Idioms

Origin of belt

before 1000; Middle English; Old English; compare Old High German balz; both < Latin balteus; see balteus
SYNONYMS FOR belt
14 gird (on).
15 flog, lash.
Related formsbelt·less, adjective

Synonym study

3. Belt and zone agree in their original meaning of a girdle or band. Belt is more used in popular or journalistic writing: the corn or wheat belt. Zone tends to be used in technical language: the Torrid Zone; a parcel-post zone.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for belt

British Dictionary definitions for belt

belt

/ (bɛlt) /

noun

verb

See also belt out, belt up
Derived Formsbelted, noun

Word Origin for belt

Old English, from Latin balteus
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Science definitions for belt

belt

[ bĕlt ]

A geographic region that is distinctive in a specific respect.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with belt

belt


In addition to the idioms beginning with belt

  • belt down
  • belt out

also see:

  • below the belt
  • bible belt
  • sun belt
  • tighten one's belt
  • under one's belt
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.