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View synonyms for strap

strap

[ strap ]

noun

  1. a narrow strip of flexible material, especially leather, as for fastening or holding things together.
  2. a looped band by which an item may be held, pulled, lifted, etc., as a bootstrap or a ring that standing passengers may hold on to in a bus, subway, or the like.
  3. a strop for a razor.
  4. a long, narrow object or piece of something; strip; band.
  5. an ornamental strip or band.
  6. Machinery. a shallow metal fitting surrounding and retaining other parts, as on the end of a rod.
  7. Nautical, Machinery. strop ( def 2 ).


verb (used with object)

, strapped, strap·ping.
  1. to fasten or secure with a strap or straps.
  2. to fasten (a thing) around something in the manner of a strap.
  3. to sharpen on a strap or strop:

    to strap a razor.

  4. to beat or flog with a strap.

strap

/ stræp /

noun

  1. a long strip of leather or similar material, for binding trunks, baggage, or other objects
  2. a strip of leather or similar material used for carrying, lifting, or holding
  3. a loop of leather, rubber, etc, suspended from the roof in a bus or train for standing passengers to hold on to
  4. a razor strop
  5. See strip
    commerce a triple option on a security or commodity consisting of one put option and two call options at the same price and for the same period Compare strip 2
  6. derogatory.
    a shameless or promiscuous woman
  7. the strap
    the strap a beating with a strap as a punishment
  8. short for shoulder strap
  9. hit one's straps informal.
    hit one's straps to achieve one's full potential or become fully effective


verb

  1. to tie or bind with a strap
  2. to beat with a strap
  3. to sharpen with a strap or strop

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Other Words From

  • strappa·ble adjective
  • straplike adjective
  • re·strap verb (used with object) restrapped restrapping
  • under·strap noun
  • under·strap verb (used with object) understrapped understrapping

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Word History and Origins

Origin of strap1

First recorded in 1565–75; variant of strop

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Word History and Origins

Origin of strap1

C16: variant of strop

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Example Sentences

Marr advises that wearers should throw their mask out if they see any damage to the material, or if the straps begin to weaken.

From Time

Don’t take the easy road and twist the ear loops to make the straps shorter, since this will pinch the top and bottom corners of each side together and make the side-gap even larger.

You can also tuck away the chin strap inside the hat, allowing for an easy transition from the lineup to land.

The nylon strap with two sliding toggles on these keeps them secure without any noticeable points of contact, so the Leggero remains surprisingly comfortable, even after a long day of use.

It weighs a hair over a pound and features an adjustable head strap.

Employees strap a device to their heads and power a helicopter drone with their minds.

Once he hits eight, we can head on over to Bullets & Burgers, and who knows, maybe they'll let him strap on a bazooka.

Strap-ons, T-injections, and lesbian sex parties—young male adventures have come a long way from Huckleberry Finn.

So, they randomly select a poor villager and strap a bucket of rats against his chest.

Someone needs to strap a jet pack on Dr. Drew and send him up to unpack these daddy issues, ASAP.

A leather cased camera was suspended from his bull neck by means of a strap.

He ran from the stamping mill, his camera bobbing from the strap around his neck and his tripod dragging behind him.

M is a motor adapted for plucking open the pallet P through the medium of strap s.

Even old Mrs. Stott had to kill her own poultry for the market though she'd strap him well for refusing.

It was probably 'the metal chape or tag fixed to the end of a girdle or strap,' viz.

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