Dictionary.com

bootstrap

[ boot-strap ]
/ ˈbutˌstræp /
Save This Word!

noun
a loop of leather or cloth sewn at the top rear, or sometimes on each side, of a boot to facilitate pulling it on.
a means of advancing oneself or accomplishing something: He used his business experience as a bootstrap to win voters.
adjective
relying entirely on one's efforts and resources: The business was a bootstrap operation for the first ten years.
self-generating or self-sustaining: a bootstrap process.
verb (used with object), boot·strapped, boot·strap·ping.
to help (oneself) without the aid of others: She spent years bootstrapping herself through college.
QUIZ
CAN YOU ANSWER THESE COMMON GRAMMAR DEBATES?
There are grammar debates that never die; and the ones highlighted in the questions in this quiz are sure to rile everyone up once again. Do you know how to answer the questions that cause some of the greatest grammar debates?
Question 1 of 7
Which sentence is correct?

Idioms about bootstrap

    pull oneself up by one's bootstraps, to help oneself without the aid of others; use one's resources: I admire him for pulling himself up by his own bootstraps.

Origin of bootstrap

First recorded in 1890–95; boot1 + strap
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use bootstrap in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for bootstrap

bootstrap
/ (ˈbuːtˌstræp) /

noun
verb -straps, -strapping or -strapped (tr)
to set up or achieve (something) using minimal resources
(foll by to) to attach (something) to a larger or more important thing
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
FEEDBACK