beak

[ beek ]
/ bik /

noun


Nearby words

  1. beady eye,
  2. beady-eyed,
  3. beagle,
  4. beaglehole,
  5. beagling,
  6. beaked,
  7. beaked pelvis,
  8. beaked salmon,
  9. beaked whale,
  10. beaker

Origin of beak

1175–1225; Middle English bec < Old French < Latin beccus < Gaulish

Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for beak


British Dictionary definitions for beak

beak

1
/ (biːk) /

noun

Derived Formsbeaked (biːkt), adjectivebeakless, adjectivebeaklike, adjectivebeaky, adjective

Word Origin for beak

C13: from Old French bec, from Latin beccus, of Gaulish origin

noun

a Brit slang word for judge, magistrate, headmaster, schoolmaster

Word Origin for beak

C19: originally thieves' jargon

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for beak

beak

n.

mid-13c., "bird's bill," from Old French bec "beak," figuratively "mouth," also "tip or point of a nose, a lance, a ship, a shoe," from Latin beccus (cf. Italian becco, Spanish pico), said by Suetonius ("De vita Caesarum" 18) to be of Gaulish origin, perhaps from Gaulish beccus, possibly related to Celtic stem bacc- "hook." Or there may be a link in Old English becca "pickax, sharp end." Jocular sense of "human nose" is from 1854 (but also was used mid-15c. in the same sense).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper