belie

[bih-lahy]

verb (used with object), be·lied, be·ly·ing.

to show to be false; contradict: His trembling hands belied his calm voice.
to misrepresent: The newspaper belied the facts.
to act unworthily according to the standards of (a tradition, one's ancestry, one's faith, etc.).
Archaic. to lie about; slander.

Origin of belie

before 1000; Middle English belyen, Old English belēogan. See be-, lie1
Related formsbe·li·er, nounun·be·lied, adjective

Synonyms for belie

Antonyms for belie

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for belies

Contemporary Examples of belies

Historical Examples of belies

  • It is when one or the other does not work correctly that one belies the other.

    Seed Thoughts for Singers

    Frank Herbert Tubbs

  • Today this gentle island, green and golden, belies its violent birth.

  • "Yes, of course," says Mr. Gower, but in a tone that belies his words.

    Portia

    Duchess

  • "Amzi, the name of 'benevolent' belies your words," he said.

    The Days of Mohammed

    Anna May Wilson

  • I have not told of anything that interferes with or belies my love for you.


British Dictionary definitions for belies

belie

verb -lies, -lying or -lied (tr)

to show to be untrue; contradict
to misrepresent; disguise the nature ofthe report belied the real extent of the damage
to fail to justify; disappoint
Derived Formsbelier, noun

Word Origin for belie

Old English belēogan; related to Old Frisian biliuga, Old High German biliugan; see be-, lie 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for belies

belie

v.

Old English beleogan "to deceive by lies," from be- + lie (v.1) "to lie, tell lies." Current sense of "to contradict as a lie" is first recorded 1640s. The other verb lie once also had a formation like this, from Old English belicgan, which meant "to encompass, beleaguer," and in Middle English was a euphemism for "to have sex with" (i.e. "to lie with carnally").

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper