bicycle

[ bahy-si-kuhl, -sik-uhl, -sahy-kuhl ]
/ ˈbaɪ sɪ kəl, -ˌsɪk əl, -ˌsaɪ kəl /

noun

a vehicle with two wheels in tandem, usually propelled by pedals connected to the rear wheel by a chain, and having handlebars for steering and a saddlelike seat.

verb (used without object), bi·cy·cled, bi·cy·cling.

to ride a bicycle.

verb (used with object), bi·cy·cled, bi·cy·cling.

to ship or transport directly by bicycle or other means.

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Origin of bicycle

From French, dating back to 1865–70; see origin at bi-1, cycle

OTHER WORDS FROM bicycle

bi·cy·clist, bi·cy·cler, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for bicycle

British Dictionary definitions for bicycle

bicycle
/ (ˈbaɪsɪkəl) /

noun

a vehicle with a tubular metal frame mounted on two spoked wheels, one behind the other. The rider sits on a saddle, propels the vehicle by means of pedals that drive the rear wheel through a chain, and steers with handlebars on the front wheelOften shortened to: cycle, informal bike

verb

(intr) to ride a bicycle; cycle

Derived forms of bicycle

bicyclist or bicycler, noun

Word Origin for bicycle

C19: from bi- 1 + Late Latin cyclus, from Greek kuklos wheel
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012