binding

[ bahyn-ding ]
/ ˈbaɪn dɪŋ /

noun

adjective

that binds; restrictive.
having power to bind or oblige; obligatory: a binding promise.

Origin of binding

Middle English word dating back to 1200–50; see origin at bind, -ing1, -ing2

Related forms

Definition for binding (2 of 2)

Origin of bind

before 1000; Middle English binden (v.), Old English bindan; cognate with Old High German bintan, Old Norse binda, Gothic bindan, Sanskrit bandhati (he) binds

Related forms

bind·a·ble, adjectivemis·bind, verb, mis·bound, mis·bind·ing.re·bind, verb, re·bound, re·bind·ing.

Can be confused

bind bound
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for binding

British Dictionary definitions for binding (1 of 2)

binding

/ (ˈbaɪndɪŋ) /

noun

anything that binds or fastens
the covering within which the pages of a book are bound
the material or tape used for binding hems, etc

adjective

imposing an obligation or dutya binding promise
causing hindrance; restrictive

British Dictionary definitions for binding (2 of 2)

bind

/ (baɪnd) /

verb binds, binding or bound

noun

See also bind over

Word Origin for bind

Old English bindan; related to Old Norse binda, Old High German bintan, Latin offendix band ², Sanskrit badhnāti he binds
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Science definitions for binding

bind

[ bīnd ]

To combine with, form a bond with, or be taken up by a chemical or chemical structure. An enzyme, for example, is structured in such a way as to be able to bind with its substrate.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with binding

bind


In addition to the idioms beginning with bind

  • bind hand and foot
  • bind over

also see:

  • in a bind

Also see underbound.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.