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bound

1
[ bound ]
/ baʊnd /
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See synonyms for: bound / bounded / bounding / boundness on Thesaurus.com

verb
simple past tense and past participle of bind.
adjective
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Idioms about bound

    bound up in / with,
    1. inseparably connected with.
    2. devoted or attached to: She is bound up in her teaching.

Origin of bound

1
Past participle and past tense of bind

OTHER WORDS FROM bound

boundness, noun

Other definitions for bound (2 of 6)

bound2
[ bound ]
/ baʊnd /

verb (used without object)
to move by leaps; leap; jump; spring: The colt bounded through the meadow.
to rebound, as a ball; bounce: The ball bounded against the wall.
noun
a leap onward or upward; jump.
a rebound; bounce.

Origin of bound

2
First recorded in 1545–55; from Middle French bond “a leap,” bondir “to leap,” originally “bounce back, echo,” ultimately from Vulgar Latin bombitīre (unattested) for bombitāre “to buzz, whiz” (Latin bomb(us) (see bomb) + -it- intensive suffix + -ā- thematic vowel + -re infinitive suffix)

synonym study for bound

1. See skip1.

OTHER WORDS FROM bound

bound·ing·ly, adverb

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH bound

bind, bound

Other definitions for bound (3 of 6)

bound3
[ bound ]
/ baʊnd /

noun
verb (used with object)
verb (used without object)
to abut.

Origin of bound

3
First recorded in1175–1225; Middle English bounde, from Anglo-French; Old French bone, bonde, variant of bodne, from Medieval Latin budina, of uncertain origin; cf. bourn2

OTHER WORDS FROM bound

bound·a·ble, adjective

Other definitions for bound (4 of 6)

bound4
[ bound ]
/ baʊnd /

adjective
going or intending to go; on the way to; destined (usually followed by for): The train is bound for Denver.
Archaic. prepared; ready.

Origin of bound

4
First recorded in 1150–1200; Middle English b(o)un) “ready,” from Old Norse būinn, past participle of būa “to get ready”

Other definitions for bound (5 of 6)

-bound1

a combining form of bound1: snowbound.

Other definitions for bound (6 of 6)

-bound2

a combining form of bound4: eastbound.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use bound in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for bound (1 of 4)

bound1
/ (baʊnd) /

verb
the past tense and past participle of bind
adjective

British Dictionary definitions for bound (2 of 4)

bound2
/ (baʊnd) /

verb
to move forwards or make (one's way) by leaps or jumps
to bounce; spring away from an impact
noun
a jump upwards or forwards
by leaps and bounds with unexpectedly rapid progessher condition improved by leaps and bounds
a sudden pronounced sense of excitementhis heart gave a sudden bound when he saw her
a bounce, as of a ball

Word Origin for bound

C16: from Old French bond a leap, from bondir to jump, resound, from Vulgar Latin bombitīre (unattested) to buzz, hum, from Latin bombus booming sound

British Dictionary definitions for bound (3 of 4)

bound3
/ (baʊnd) /

verb
(tr) to place restrictions on; limit
(when intr, foll by on) to form a boundary of (an area of land or sea, political or administrative region, etc)
noun
maths
  1. a number which is greater than all the members of a set of numbers (an upper bound), or less than all its members (a lower bound)See also bounded (def. 1)
  2. more generally, an element of an ordered set that has the same ordering relation to all the members of a given subset
  3. whence, an estimate of the extent of some set
See bounds

Word Origin for bound

C13: from Old French bonde, from Medieval Latin bodina, of Gaulish origin

British Dictionary definitions for bound (4 of 4)

bound4
/ (baʊnd) /

adjective
  1. (postpositive, often foll by for) going or intending to go towards; on the way toa ship bound for Jamaica; homeward bound
  2. (in combination)northbound traffic

Word Origin for bound

C13: from Old Norse buinn, past participle of būa to prepare
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with bound

bound

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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