bing

1
[ bing ]
/ bɪŋ /

noun British Dialect.

a heap or pile.

Nearby words

  1. bindweed,
  2. bine,
  3. binet,
  4. binet, alfred,
  5. binet-simon scale,
  6. bing xin,
  7. bing, rudolf,
  8. binge,
  9. binge drinking,
  10. binge eating

Origin of bing

1
1275–1325; Middle English < Old Norse bingr bunk, bin

bing

2
[ bing ]
/ bɪŋ /

verb (used without object) Obsolete.

to go.

Origin of bing

2
First recorded in 1560–70; origin uncertain

Bing

1
[ bing ]
/ bɪŋ /

noun

Sir Rudolf,1902–97, English opera impresario born in Austria; in the U.S. 1949–97.
a male given name.

Bing

2
[ bing ]
/ bɪŋ /

noun

a variety of dark red or blackish sweet cherry.

Origin of Bing

2
An Americanism dating back to 1920–25

Also called Bing cherry.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for bing


British Dictionary definitions for bing

bing

/ (bɪŋ) /

noun

dialect a heap or pile, esp of spoil from a mine

Word Origin for bing

C16: from Old Norse bingr heap

Bing

/ (bɪŋ) /

noun

a popular search engine on the internet

verb

to search for (something on the internet) using Bing
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for bing

bing

n.

"heap or pile," 1510s, from Old Norse bingr "heap." Also used from early 14c. as a word for bin, perhaps from notion of "place where things are piled."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper