blackjack

[ blak-jak ]
/ ˈblækˌdʒæk /

noun

verb (used with object)

to strike or beat with a blackjack.
to compel by threat.

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Origin of blackjack

First recorded in 1505–15; black + jack1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for blackjack

British Dictionary definitions for blackjack (1 of 5)

blackjack1
/ (ˈblækˌdʒæk) mainly US and Canadian /

noun

a truncheon of leather-covered lead with a flexible shaft

verb

(tr) to hit with or as if with a blackjack
(tr) to compel (a person) by threats

Word Origin for blackjack

C19: from black + jack 1 (implement)

British Dictionary definitions for blackjack (2 of 5)

blackjack2
/ (ˈblækˌdʒæk) /

noun cards

pontoon or any of various similar card games
the ace of spades

Word Origin for blackjack

C20: from black + jack 1 (the knave)

British Dictionary definitions for blackjack (3 of 5)

blackjack3
/ (ˈblækˌdʒæk) /

noun

a dark iron-rich variety of the mineral sphalerite

Word Origin for blackjack

C18: from black + jack 1 (originally a miner's name for this useless ore)

British Dictionary definitions for blackjack (4 of 5)

blackjack4
/ (ˈblækˌdʒæk) /

noun

a small oak tree, Quercus marilandica, of the southeastern US, with blackish bark and fan-shaped leavesAlso called: blackjack oak

Word Origin for blackjack

C19: from black + jack 1 (from the proper name, popularly used in many plant names)

British Dictionary definitions for blackjack (5 of 5)

blackjack5
/ (ˈblækˌdʒæk) /

noun

a tarred leather tankard or jug

Word Origin for blackjack

C16: from black + jack ³
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012