bloom

1
[ bloom ]
/ blum /
|||

noun

verb (used without object)

verb (used with object)


Nearby words

  1. bloody shirt,
  2. bloody-minded,
  3. bloody-nosed beetle,
  4. blooey,
  5. blook,
  6. bloom, harold,
  7. bloomed,
  8. bloomer,
  9. bloomer, amelia jenks,
  10. bloomers

Idioms

    take the bloom off, to remove the enjoyment or ultimate satisfaction from; dampen the enthusiasm over: The coach's illness took the bloom off the team's victory.
    the bloom is off (the rose), the excitement, enjoyment, interest, etc., has ended or been dampened.

Origin of bloom

1
1150–1200; (noun) Middle English blom, blome < Old Norse blōm, blōmi; cognate with Gothic blōma lily, German Blume flower; akin to blow3; (v.) Middle English blomen, derivative of the noun

Related formsbloom·less, adjective

bloom

2
[ bloom ]
/ blum /
Metalworking.

noun

a piece of steel, square or slightly oblong in section, reduced from an ingot to dimensions suitable for further rolling.
a large lump of iron and slag, of pasty consistency when hot, produced in a puddling furnace or bloomery and hammered into wrought iron.

verb (used with object)

to make (an ingot) into a bloom.

Origin of bloom

2
before 1000; representing Anglo-Latin, Anglo-French blomes (plural), Old English blōma mass of iron; perhaps akin to bloom1

Bloom

[ bloom ]
/ blum /

noun

Harold,born 1930, U.S. literary critic and teacher.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for bloom


British Dictionary definitions for bloom

bloom

1
/ (bluːm) /

noun

verb (mainly intr)

Word Origin for bloom

C13: of Germanic origin; compare Old Norse blōm flower, Old High German bluomo, Middle Dutch bloeme; see blow ³

noun

a rectangular mass of metal obtained by rolling or forging a cast ingotSee also billet 1 (def. 2)

verb

(tr) to convert (an ingot) into a bloom by rolling or forging

Word Origin for bloom

Old English blōma lump of metal

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for bloom
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper