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bona fide

or bona-fide

[ boh-nuh -fahyd, bon-uh; boh-nuh -fahy-dee ]
/ ˈboʊ nə ˌfaɪd, ˈbɒn ə; ˈboʊ nə ˈfaɪ di /
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adjective

made, done, presented, etc., in good faith; without deception or fraud: a bona fide statement of intent to sell.
authentic; true: a bona fide sample of Lincoln's handwriting.

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Origin of bona fide

First recorded in 1535–45; from Latin bonā fidē “in good faith, with good faith,” ablative singular of (nominative singular) bona fidēs; see also bona fides

usage note for bona fide

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH bona fide

bona fide , bona fides (see usage note at bona fides)

Words nearby bona fide

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for bona fide

British Dictionary definitions for bona fide

bona fide

adjective (ˈbəʊnə ˈfaɪdɪ)

real or genuinea bona fide manuscript
undertaken in good faitha bona fide agreement

noun (ˈbɔːnə fɑɪd)

Irish informal a public house licensed to remain open after normal hours to serve bona fide travellers

Word Origin for bona fide

C16: from Latin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Cultural definitions for bona fide

bona fide
[ (boh-nuh feyed, boh-nuh feye-dee, bon-uh feyed) ]

Genuine: “The offer was a bona fide business opportunity: they really meant to carry it through.” From Latin, meaning “in good faith.”

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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