boomer

[boo-mer]
noun
  1. a person or thing that booms.
  2. a person who settles in areas or towns that are booming.
  3. Informal. baby boomer.
  4. Informal. a wandering or migratory worker; hobo.
  5. a period of sudden and decisive economic growth: July was a boomer for the retail trade.
  6. Informal. a person, fad, etc., that enjoys a brief popularity or financial success: A new group of boomers made this season's hit record.
  7. an enthusiastic supporter; booster: The boomers tell us our town can double its size.
  8. Australian. a fully grown male kangaroo, especially a large one.

Origin of boomer

First recorded in 1820–30; boom1 + -er1

boom

1
[boom]
verb (used without object)
  1. to make a deep, prolonged, resonant sound.
  2. to move with a resounding rush or great impetus.
  3. to progress, grow, or flourish vigorously, as a business or a city: Her business is booming since she enlarged the store.
verb (used with object)
  1. to give forth with a booming sound (often followed by out): The clock boomed out nine.
  2. to boost; campaign for vigorously: His followers are booming George for mayor.
noun
  1. a deep, prolonged, resonant sound.
  2. the resonant cry of a bird or animal.
  3. a buzzing, humming, or droning, as of a bee or beetle.
  4. a rapid increase in price, development, numbers, etc.: a boom in housing construction.
  5. a period of rapid economic growth, prosperity, high wages and prices, and relatively full employment.
  6. a rise in popularity, as of a political candidate.
adjective
  1. caused by or characteristic of a boom: boom prices.

Origin of boom

1
1400–50; 1910–15 for def 10; late Middle English bombon, bummyn to buzz; cognate with Dutch bommen, German bummen, orig. imitative
Related formsboom·ing·ly, adverb

Synonyms for boom

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for boomer

Contemporary Examples of boomer

Historical Examples of boomer

  • "You're a good one for fairy tales," was the boomer's silent comment.

    The Boy Land Boomer

    Ralph Bonehill

  • "Poor Bonnie Bird, to have to carry a dirty redskin," thought the boomer.

    The Boy Land Boomer

    Ralph Bonehill

  • Immediately after this the boomer held a short consultation with Clemmer.

    The Boy Land Boomer

    Ralph Bonehill

  • "I ain't taking the word of any boomer," muttered Tucker sourly.

    The Boy Land Boomer

    Ralph Bonehill

  • The boomer could use a lariat as well as Clemmer or any of the cowboys.

    The Boy Land Boomer

    Ralph Bonehill


British Dictionary definitions for boomer

boomer

noun
  1. Australian a large male kangaroo
  2. Australian and NZ informal anything exceptionally large

Word Origin for boomer

from English dialect

boom

1
verb
  1. to make a deep prolonged resonant sound, as of thunder or artillery fire
  2. to prosper or cause to prosper vigorously and rapidlybusiness boomed
noun
  1. a deep prolonged resonant soundthe boom of the sea
  2. the cry of certain animals, esp the bittern
  3. a period of high economic growth characterized by rising wages, profits, and prices, full employment, and high levels of investment, trade, and other economic activityCompare depression (def. 5)
  4. any similar period of high activity
  5. the activity itselfa baby boom

Word Origin for boom

C15: perhaps from Dutch bommen, of imitative origin

boom

2
noun
  1. nautical a spar to which a sail is fastened to control its position relative to the wind
  2. a beam or spar pivoting at the foot of the mast of a derrick, controlling the distance from the mast at which a load is lifted or lowered
  3. a pole, usually extensible, carrying an overhead microphone and projected over a film or television set
    1. a barrier across a waterway, usually consisting of a chain of connected floating logs, to confine free-floating logs, protect a harbour from attack, etc
    2. the area so barred off

Word Origin for boom

C16: from Dutch boom tree, beam
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for boomer

boom

v.

mid-15c., earliest use was for bees and wasps, probably echoic of humming. The meaning "make a loud noise" is 15c. Cf. bomb. Meaning "to burst into prosperity" (of places, businesses, etc.) is 1871, American English. Related: Boomed; booming. Boom box first attested 1978.

boom

n.1

"long pole," 1540s, from Scottish boun, borrowed from Dutch boom "tree, pole, beam," from a Middle Dutch word analogous to Old English beam (see beam (n.)).

boom

n.2

in the business sense, 1873, sometimes said to be from boom (n.1), from the nautical meaning "a long spar run out to extend the foot of a sail" -- a ship "booming" being one in full sail. But it could just as well be from boom (v.) on the notion of "suddenness."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with boomer

boom

see lower the boom.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.