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bowery

1
[ bou-uh-ree ]
/ ˈbaʊ ə ri /
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adjective

containing bowers; leafy; shady: a bowery maze.

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Origin of bowery

1
First recorded in 1695–1705; bower1 + -y1

Definition for bowery (2 of 2)

bowery2
[ bou-uh-ree, bou-ree ]
/ ˈbaʊ ə ri, ˈbaʊ ri /

noun, plural bow·er·ies.

(among the Dutch settlers of New York) a farm or country seat.
the Bowery, a street and area in New York City, historically noted for its cheap hotels and saloons and peopled by the destitute and homeless.

Origin of bowery

2
1640–50, Americanism;<Dutch bouwerij farm, equivalent to bouw cultivation + -erij-ery
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use bowery in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for bowery

Bowery
/ (ˈbaʊərɪ) /

noun

the Bowery a street in New York City noted for its cheap hotels and bars, frequented by vagrants and drunks

Word Origin for Bowery

C17: from Dutch bouwerij, from bouwen to farm + erij -ery; see boor, Boer
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Cultural definitions for bowery

Bowery

A section of lower Manhattan in New York City.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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