brash

[ brash ]
/ bræʃ /

adjective, brash·er, brash·est. Also brashy.

noun

Origin of brash

1400–50; (noun) late Middle English brass(c)he a slap, crash, perhaps blend of brok(e) (Old English broc breach, fragment, sickness; akin to break) and dasch smashing blow; see dash1; (adj.) in sense “brittle,” derivative of noun; in sense “hasty” by confusion with rash1

Related forms

brash·ly, adverbbrash·ness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for brashly

  • This was a victory that could only have been won by a political movement with a brashly irrational self-confidence.

  • At first, I was brashly incredulous, as anyone would be who was mixing and mingling with the colonel in the daily amenities.

    The King of Arcadia|Francis Lynde

British Dictionary definitions for brashly (1 of 3)

brash

1
/ (bræʃ) /

adjective

tastelessly or offensively loud, showy, or bold
hasty; rash
impudent

Derived Forms

brashly, adverbbrashness, noun

Word Origin for brash

C19: perhaps influenced by rash 1

British Dictionary definitions for brashly (2 of 3)

brash

2
/ (bræʃ) /

noun

loose rubbish, such as broken rock, hedge clippings, etc; debris

Word Origin for brash

C18: of unknown origin

British Dictionary definitions for brashly (3 of 3)

brash

3
/ (bræʃ) /

noun

pathol another name for heartburn

Word Origin for brash

C16: perhaps of imitative origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012