breaker

1
[brey-ker]

noun

interjection

Citizens Band Radio Slang. (used to announce that a person is about to transmit a message or question on a channel, especially one already in use.)

Nearby words

  1. breakbeat,
  2. breakbone fever,
  3. breakdown,
  4. breakdown van,
  5. breakdown voltage,
  6. breaker card,
  7. breaker strip,
  8. breaker zone,
  9. breakerless ignition,
  10. breakeven

Origin of breaker

1
Middle English word dating back to 1125–75; see origin at break, -er1

breaker

2
[brey-ker]

noun Nautical.

a small water cask for use in a boat.

Origin of breaker

2
1825–35; said to be alteration of Spanish bareca, variant of barrica small keg

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for breaker


British Dictionary definitions for breaker

breaker

1

noun

a person or thing that breaks something, such as a person or firm that breaks up old cars, etc
a large wave with a white crest on the open sea or one that breaks into foam on the shore
electronics short for circuit breaker
a machine or plant for crushing rocks or coal
Also called: breaking plough a plough with a long shallow mouldboard for turning virgin land or sod land
textiles a machine for extracting fibre preparatory to carding
an operator on citizens' band radio

noun

a small water cask for use in a boat

Word Origin for breaker

C19: anglicized variant of Spanish barrica, from French (Gascon dialect) barrique

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for breaker

breaker

n.

"heavy ocean wave," 1680s, agent noun from break (v.). Related: Breakers.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Science definitions for breaker

breaker

[brākər]

A wave that crests or breaks into foam, as against a shoreline.
A circuit breaker.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.