brook

1
[ brook ]
/ brʊk /

noun

a small, natural stream of fresh water.

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Origin of brook

1
before 900; Middle English; Old English brōc stream; cognate with Dutch broek,German Bruch marsh

OTHER WORDS FROM brook

brookless, adjectivebrooklike, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH brook

brook , creek, river, stream

Definition for brook (2 of 2)

brook2
[ brook ]
/ brʊk /

verb (used with object)

to bear; suffer; tolerate: I will brook no interference.

Origin of brook

2
before 900; Middle English brouken,Old English brūcan; cognate with Dutch bruiken,German brauchen; akin to Gothic brukjan,Latin fruī to enjoy

OTHER WORDS FROM brook

brook·a·ble, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for brook

British Dictionary definitions for brook (1 of 3)

brook1
/ (brʊk) /

noun

a natural freshwater stream smaller than a river

Word Origin for brook

Old English brōc; related to Old High German bruoh swamp, Dutch broek

British Dictionary definitions for brook (2 of 3)

brook2
/ (brʊk) /

verb

(tr; usually used with a negative) to bear; tolerate

Derived forms of brook

brookable, adjective

Word Origin for brook

Old English brūcan; related to Gothic brūkjan to use, Old High German brūhhan, Latin fruī to enjoy

British Dictionary definitions for brook (3 of 3)

Brook
/ (brʊk) /

noun

Peter (Paul Stephen). born 1925, British stage and film director, noted esp for his experimental work in the theatre
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012