Burns

[ burnz ]
/ bɜrnz /

noun

Arthur F(rank),1904–1987, U.S. economist, born in Austria: chairman of the Federal Reserve Board 1970–78.
GeorgeNathan Birnbaum, 1896–1996, U.S. comedian (partner and husband of Gracie Allen).
Robert,1759–96, Scottish poet.
TommyNoah Brusso, 1881–1955, U.S. boxer: world heavyweight champion 1906–08.

Definition for burns (2 of 3)

Origin of burn

1
before 900; Middle English bernen, brennen, Old English beornan (intransitive), (cognate with Gothic, Old High German brinnan), and Old English bærnan (transitive), (cognate with Gothic brannjan, Old High German brennen)

SYNONYMS FOR burn

Related forms

Synonym study

16. Burn, scorch, sear, singe refer to the effect of fire or heat. To burn is to consume, wholly or in part, by contact with fire or excessive heat: to burn leaves. Scorch implies superficial or slight burning, resulting in a change of color or in injury to the texture because of shriveling or curling: to scorch a dress while ironing. Sear refers especially to the drying or hardening caused by heat: to sear a roast of meat. Singe applies especially to a superficial burning that takes off ends or projections: to singe hair; singe the pinfeathers from a chicken.

Definition for burns (3 of 3)

burn

2
[ burn ]
/ bɜrn /

noun Scot. and North England.

a brook or rivulet.
Also bourn, bourne.

Origin of burn

2
before 900; Middle English burne, bourne, Old English burna, brunna brook; cognate with Gothic brunna, Dutch born, bron, German Brunnen, Old Norse brunnr spring
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for burns

British Dictionary definitions for burns (1 of 3)

Burns

/ (bɜːnz) /

noun

Robert . 1759–96, Scottish lyric poet. His verse, written mostly in dialect, includes love songs, nature poetry, and satires. Auld Lang Syne and Tam o' Shanter are among his best known poems

British Dictionary definitions for burns (2 of 3)

burn

1
/ (bɜːn) /

verb burns, burning, burnt or burned

noun

Word Origin for burn

Old English beornan (intr), bærnan (tr); related to Old Norse brenna (tr or intr), Gothic brinnan (intr), Latin fervēre to boil, seethe

British Dictionary definitions for burns (3 of 3)

burn

2
/ (bɜːn, Scottish bʌrn) /

noun

Scot and Northern English a small stream; brook

Word Origin for burn

Old English burna; related to Old Norse brunnr spring, Old High German brunno, Lithuanian briáutis to burst forth
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for burns

burn

[ bûrn ]

v.

n.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for burns

burn

[ bûrn ]

Verb

To be on fire; undergo combustion. A substance burns if it is heated up enough to react chemically with oxygen.
To cause a burn to a bodily tissue.

Noun

Tissue injury caused by fire, heat, radiation (such as sun exposure), electricity, or a caustic chemical agent. Burns are classified according to the degree of tissue damage, which can include redness, blisters, skin edema and loss of sensation. Bacterial infection is a serious and sometimes fatal complication of severe burns.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with burns

burn


In addition to the idioms beginning with burn

  • burn at the stake
  • burn down
  • burned up
  • burn in effigy
  • burning question
  • burn into
  • burn off
  • burn one's bridges
  • burn oneself out
  • burn one's fingers
  • burn out
  • burn rubber
  • burn someone up
  • burn the candle at both ends
  • burn the midnight oil
  • burn to a cinder
  • burn up

also see:

  • crash and burn
  • ears are burning
  • fiddle while Rome burns
  • (burn) in effigy
  • money burns a hole in one's pocket
  • money to burn
  • slow burn
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.