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busk

[ buhsk ]

verb (used without object)

  1. to entertain by dancing, singing, reciting, juggling, etc., on the street or in a public place.
  2. Canadian. to make a showy or noisy appeal.


busk

1

/ bʌsk /

noun

  1. a strip of whalebone, wood, steel, etc, inserted into the front of a corset to stiffen it
  2. archaic.
    the corset itself


busk

2

/ bʌsk /

verb

  1. intr to make money by singing, dancing, acting, etc, in public places, as in front of theatre queues

busk

3

/ bʌsk /

verb

  1. to make ready; prepare
  2. to dress or adorn
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Derived Forms

  • ˈbusking, noun
  • ˈbusker, noun
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Other Words From

  • busk·er noun
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Word History and Origins

Origin of busk1

First recorded in 1850–55; origin unclear; perhaps, if earlier sense was “to make a living by entertaining,” from Polari, from Italian buscare “to procure, get, gain,” from Spanish buscar “to look for, seek”
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Word History and Origins

Origin of busk1

C16: from Old French busc , probably from Old Italian busco splinter, stick, of Germanic origin

Origin of busk2

C20: perhaps from Spanish buscar to look for

Origin of busk3

C14: from Old Norse būask , from būa to make ready, dwell; see bower 1
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Example Sentences

Because they’re also significantly lower in wattage than traditional amplifiers, practice amps consume less power, making them an all-around better choice for every day playing purposes and portable use like busking and performing in small spaces.

Andrews and Herring both say that they’re getting more money from busking now than they did before the pandemic.

I clicked open the link to a band who appeared to have journeyed from their mountain village in Russia to busk for tourists in the city square.

Leif and his house-carls, of whom there were ten present at the time, did not take long to busk them for the fight.

Miss Busk gives a free adaptation rather than a translation of the German version, “Sagas,” p. 315.

Get thee home, Ralph; follow him, Jane; he shall not have so much as a busk-point from thee.

Septem spice plene pullulabant in culmo vno, C. busk, bush, for stalk is curious.

Any attempt at concealing pregnancy, by tight lacing and the application of a stronger busk, cannot be too severely condemned.

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