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View synonyms for canning

canning

1

[ kan-ing ]

noun

  1. the act, process, or business of preserving cooked food by sealing in cans can or jars.


Canning

2

[ kan-ing ]

noun

  1. Charles John, 1st Earl, 1812–62, British statesman: governor general of India 1856–62.
  2. his father George, 1770–1827, British statesman: prime minister 1827.

canning

1

/ ˈkænɪŋ /

noun

  1. the process or business of sealing food in cans or tins to preserve it


Canning

2

/ ˈkænɪŋ /

noun

  1. CanningCharles John, 1st Earl Canning18121862MBritishPOLITICS: statesman Charles John, 1st Earl Canning. 1812–62, British statesman; governor general of India (1856–58) and first viceroy (1858–62)
  2. CanningGeorge17701827MBritishPOLITICS: statesmanPOLITICS: prime minister his father, George. 1770–1827, British Tory statesman; foreign secretary (1822–27) and prime minister (1827)
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Other Words From

  • pre·canning noun adjective
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Word History and Origins

Origin of canning1

An Americanism dating back to 1870–75; can 2 + -ing 1
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Example Sentences

Those that do require a fee are often just to cover the cost of materials, such as for a canning class, Mosbacher says.

But, as they explain, “canning is incredibly dangerous, and the USDA takes it incredibly seriously.”

From Eater

Bon Appétit isn’t the first mainstream publication to give out potentially dangerous canning advice.

This isn’t a problem that’s going to be solved until more canning capacity comes online.

From Fortune

Mobile canning companies have been in high demand, meaning it’s harder to slot time to get the beer into cans—and the cost of working with those services cuts into margins.

From Fortune

You can get anything into prison with a canning machine and a labeler.

Noel Canning comes out of the dysfunction surrounding appointments to the five-member NLRB.

Right now if you do a Google search for “spoiled teen” one name dominates the first few pages of results: Rachel Canning.

According to reports, an investigation into abuse claims led authorities to determine Canning was merely “spoiled.”

In Canning he found, or rather projected, “a genius, almost a universal one, an orator, a wit, a poet, a statesman.”

Everybody seemed to make money in the canning business and I thought it would be a good investment.

It was an unfair criticism, at least of Canning and Palmerston, tied though the latter's hands were by court and colleagues.

If they get both Canning and Peel, they may do; but I don't look to this.

The answer to Mr. Canning's famous riddle is "Cares—Caress."

"Canning circles" have been managed successfully in some parts of the country.

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cannikinCanning Basin