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captive

[ kap-tiv ]
/ ˈkæp tɪv /
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noun

a prisoner.
a person who is enslaved or dominated: He is the captive of his own fears.

adjective

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Origin of captive

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English or directly from Middle French, from Latin captīvus, equivalent to capt(us) “taken” (past participle of capere “to take”) + -īvus adjective suffix (see -ive)
non·cap·tive, adjectivepseu·do·cap·tive, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for captive

captive
/ (ˈkæptɪv) /

noun

a person or animal that is confined or restrained, esp a prisoner of war
a person whose behaviour is dominated by some emotiona captive of love

adjective

held as prisoner
held under restriction or control; confinedcaptive water held behind a dam
captivated; enraptured
unable by circumstances to avoid speeches, advertisements, etc (esp in the phrase captive audience)
C14: from Latin captīvus, from capere to take
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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