casual

[ kazh-oo-uhl ]
/ ˈkæʒ u əl /

adjective

noun


Nearby words

  1. castro valley,
  2. castro, cipriano,
  3. castro, fidel,
  4. castroism,
  5. castrop-rauxel,
  6. casual contact,
  7. casual friday,
  8. casualization,
  9. casually,
  10. casualness

Origin of casual

1325–75; Middle English < Latin cāsuālis, equivalent to cāsu(s) case1 + -ālis -al1; replacing Middle English casuel < Middle French < Latin as above

Related forms

Synonym study

1. See accidental.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for casual


British Dictionary definitions for casual

casual

/ (ˈkæʒjʊəl) /

adjective

noun

Derived Formscasually, adverbcasualness, noun

Word Origin for casual

C14: from Late Latin cāsuālis happening by chance, from Latin cāsus event, from cadere to fall; see case 1

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for casual

casual

adj.

late 14c., "subject to or produced by chance," from Middle French casuel (15c.), from Late Latin casualis "by chance," from Latin casus "chance, occasion, opportunity; accident, event" (see case (n.1)).

Of persons, in the sense of "not to be depended on, unmethodical," it is attested from 1883; meaning "showing lack of interest" is from 1916. Of clothes, "informal," from 1939. Related: Casually.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper