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certiorari

[ sur-shee-uh-rair-ahy, -rair-ee ]

noun

, Law.
  1. a writ issuing from a superior court calling up the record of a proceeding in an inferior court for review.


certiorari

/ ˌsɜːtɪɔːˈrɛəraɪ /

noun

  1. law an order of a superior court directing that a record of proceedings in a lower court be sent up for review See also mandamus prohibition


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Word History and Origins

Origin of certiorari1

First recorded in 1515–25; from Latin: “to be informed, certified,” literally, “made surer,” passive infinitive of certiōrāre “to inform,” verbal derivative of certior, comparative of certus “sure”; so called because the passive infinitive form occurred in the Latin original; certain
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Word History and Origins

Origin of certiorari1

C15: from legal Latin: to be informed
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Example Sentences

Although the vote of individual justices isn’t listed, the denial of certiorari means there wasn’t at least three justices who would agree to take up the case when the issue came up in conference.

This month, LaPorta filed a petition for certiorari to the Supreme Court, asking the justices to reinstate the verdict.

It takes a vote of four justices to grant a writ of certiorari, or agree to take up a case.

The obvious resource, therefore, was to obtain a writ of certiorari removing our indictment to the superior court.

He was compelled to surrender possession without the formality of a mandamus, quo warranto certiorari or appeal.

Under certain conditions, if the defendant's hardship could be definitely shown, a writ of certiorari and supersedeas might issue.

An appeal from the jurisdiction of the courts lies by way of certiorari.

Certiorari—To order the record from an inferior to a superior court.

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