chuck

1
[chuhk]
See more synonyms for chuck on Thesaurus.com
verb (used with object)
  1. to toss; throw with a quick motion, usually a short distance.
  2. Informal. to resign from; relinquish; give up: He's chucked his job.
  3. to pat or tap lightly, as under the chin.
  4. Informal. to eject (a person) from a public place (often followed by out): They chucked him from the bar.
  5. Slang. to vomit; upchuck.
noun
  1. a light pat or tap, as under the chin.
  2. a toss or pitch; a short throw.
  3. a sudden jerk or change in direction.
Idioms
  1. chuck it, British Slang. stop it; shut up.

Origin of chuck

1
First recorded in 1575–85; origin uncertain

Synonyms for chuck

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chuck

2
[chuhk]
noun
  1. the cut of beef between the neck and the shoulder blade.
  2. a block or log used as a chock.
  3. Machinery.
    1. a device for centering and clamping work in a lathe or other machine tool.
    2. a device for holding a drill bit.
verb (used with object)
  1. Machinery. to hold or secure with a chuck.

Origin of chuck

2
1665–75; variant of chock. See chunk1

chuck

3
[chuhk]
verb (used with or without object)
  1. to cluck.
noun
  1. a clucking sound.
  2. Archaic. (used as a term of endearment): my love, my chuck.

Origin of chuck

3
1350–1400; Middle English chuk, expressive word, apparently imitative

chuck

4
[chuhk]
noun Western U.S. Slang.
  1. food; provisions.

Origin of chuck

4
First recorded in 1840–50; special use of chuck2

chuck

5
[chuhk]
noun Informal.
  1. woodchuck.

Origin of chuck

5
by shortening

chuck

6
[chuhk]
noun Canadian Slang.
  1. water.
  2. any body of water.

Origin of chuck

6
1855–60; < Chinook Jargon, probably < Nootka čʾaʔak water, reinforced by Lower Chinook ł-čuq water

Chuck

[chuhk]
noun
  1. a male given name, form of Charles.
  2. Older Slang: Usually Disparaging and Offensive.
    1. a term used to refer to a white person.
    2. white society, culture, and values.

Usage note

Chuck in its slang sense was used especially in the 1960s and 1970s by black people. This use arose by analogy with Mister Charlie, a slang term used in the same sense and also derived from a nickname for Charles.

Yeager

[yey-ger]
noun
  1. Charles (Elwood)Chuck, born 1923, U.S. aviator and test pilot: the first person to fly faster than the speed of sound (1947).

Berry

[ber-ee; for 2 also French be-ree]
noun
  1. Charles Edward AndersonChuck, born 1926, U.S. rock-'n'-roll singer, musician, and composer.
  2. Also Ber·ri. a former province in central France.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


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British Dictionary definitions for chuck

chuck

1
verb (mainly tr)
  1. informal to throw
  2. to pat affectionately, esp under the chin
  3. (sometimes foll by in or up) informal to give up; rejecthe chucked up his job; she chucked her boyfriend
  4. (intr usually foll by up) slang, mainly US to vomit
  5. chuck off at Australian and NZ informal to abuse or make fun of
noun
  1. a throw or toss
  2. a playful pat under the chin
  3. the chuck informal dismissal

Word Origin for chuck

C16: of unknown origin

chuck

2
noun
  1. Also called: chuck steak a cut of beef extending from the neck to the shoulder blade
    1. Also called: three jaw chucka device that holds a workpiece in a lathe or tool in a drill, having a number of adjustable jaws geared to move in unison to centralize the workpiece or tool
    2. Also called: four jaw chuck, independent jaw chucka similar device having independently adjustable jaws for holding an unsymmetrical workpiece

Word Origin for chuck

C17: variant of chock

chuck

3
verb
  1. (intr) a less common word for cluck (def. 2)
noun
  1. a clucking sound
  2. a term of endearment

Word Origin for chuck

C14 chukken to cluck, of imitative origin

chuck

4
noun Canadian West coast
  1. a large body of water
  2. short for saltchuck

Word Origin for chuck

C19: from Chinook Jargon, from Nootka chauk

berry

noun plural -ries
  1. any of various small edible fruits such as the blackberry and strawberry
  2. botany an indehiscent fruit with two or more seeds and a fleshy pericarp, such as the grape or gooseberry
  3. any of various seeds or dried kernels, such as a coffee bean
  4. the egg of a lobster, crayfish, or similar animal
verb -ries, -rying or -ried (intr)
  1. to bear or produce berries
  2. to gather or look for berries
Derived Formsberried, adjective

Word Origin for berry

Old English berie; related to Old High German beri, Dutch bezie

Berry

noun
  1. (ˈbɛrɪ) Chuck, full name Charles Edward Berry . born 1926, US rock-and-roll guitarist, singer, and songwriter. His frequently covered songs include "Maybellene" (1955), "Roll Over Beethoven" (1956), "Johnny B. Goode" (1958), "Memphis, Tennessee" (1959), and "Promised Land" (1964)
  2. (French bɛri) Jean de France (ʒɑ̃ də frɑ̃s), Duc de. 1340–1416, French prince, son of King John II; coregent (1380–88) for Charles VI and a famous patron of the arts
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for chuck
v.1

"to throw," 1590s, variant of chock "give a blow under the chin" (1580s), possibly from French choquer "to shock, strike against," imitative (see shock (n.1)). Related: Chucked; chucking.

n.1

"piece of wood or meat," 1670s, probably a variant of chock (n.) "block." "Chock and chuck appear to have been originally variants of the same word, which are now somewhat differentiated." Specifically of shoulder meat from early 18c. American English chuck wagon (1880) is from the meat sense.

n.2

"slight blow under the chin," 1610s, from chuck (v.1). Meaning "a toss, a throw" is from 1862. Related: Chucked; chucking.

berry

n.

Old English berie, from Proto-Germanic *basjom (cf. Old Norse ber, Middle Dutch bere, German Beere "berry;" Old Saxon winber, Gothic weinabasi "grape"), of unknown origin. This and apple are the only native fruit names.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

chuck in Science

berry

[bĕrē]
  1. A simple fruit that has many seeds in a fleshy pulp. Grapes, bananas, tomatoes, and blueberries are berries. Compare drupe pome. See more at simple fruit.
  2. A seed or dried kernel of certain kinds of grain or other plants such as wheat, barley, or coffee.
Usage: Cucumbers and tomatoes aren't usually thought of as berries, but to a botanist they are in fact berries, while strawberries and raspberries are not. In botany, a berry is a fleshy kind of simple fruit consisting of a single ovary that has multiple seeds. Other true berries besides cucumbers and tomatoes are bananas, oranges, grapes, and blueberries. Many fruits that are popularly called berries have a different structure and thus are not true berries. For example, strawberries and raspberries are aggregate fruits, developed from multiple ovaries of a single flower. The mulberry is not a true berry either. It is a multiple fruit, like the pineapple, and is made up of the ovaries of several individual flowers.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.