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cicatrix

[ sik-uh-triks, si-key-triks ]
/ ˈsɪk ə trɪks, sɪˈkeɪ trɪks /
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noun, plural cic·a·tri·ces [sik-uh-trahy-seez]. /ˌsɪk əˈtraɪ siz/.
Physiology. new tissue that forms over a wound and later contracts into a scar.
Botany. a scar left by a fallen leaf, seed, etc.
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Also cic·a·trice [sik-uh-tris]. /ˈsɪk ə trɪs/.

Origin of cicatrix

1350–1400; Middle English <Latin: scar

OTHER WORDS FROM cicatrix

cic·a·tri·cial [sik-uh-trish-uhl], /ˌsɪk əˈtrɪʃ əl/, adjectiveci·cat·ri·cose [si-ka-tri-kohs, sik-uh-], /sɪˈkæ trɪˌkoʊs, ˈsɪk ə-/, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use cicatrix in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for cicatrix

cicatrix
/ (ˈsɪkətrɪks) /

noun plural cicatrices (ˌsɪkəˈtraɪsiːz)
the tissue that forms in a wound during healing; scar
a scar on a plant indicating the former point of attachment of a part, esp a leaf

Derived forms of cicatrix

cicatricial (ˌsɪkəˈtrɪʃəl), adjectivecicatricose (sɪˈkætrɪˌkəʊs, ˈsɪkə-), adjective

Word Origin for cicatrix

C17: from Latin: scar, of obscure origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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