wound

1
[ woond; Older Use and Literary wound ]
/ wund; Older Use and Literary waʊnd /

noun

an injury, usually involving division of tissue or rupture of the integument or mucous membrane, due to external violence or some mechanical agency rather than disease.
a similar injury to the tissue of a plant.
an injury or hurt to feelings, sensibilities, reputation, etc.

verb (used with object)

to inflict a wound upon; injure; hurt.

verb (used without object)

to inflict a wound.

Idioms

    lick one's wounds, to attempt to heal one's injuries or soothe one's hurt feelings after a defeat.

Origin of wound

1
before 900; (noun) Middle English; Old English wund; cognate with Old High German wunta (German Wunde), Old Norse und, Gothic wunds; (v.) Middle English wounden, Old English wundian, derivative of the noun

SYNONYMS FOR wound

3 insult, pain, anguish.
4 harm, damage; cut, stab, lacerate.

Related forms

wound·ed·ly, adverbwound·ing·ly, adverb

Definition for wound (2 of 5)

wound

2
[ wound ]
/ waʊnd /

verb

a simple past tense and past participle of wind2 and wind3.

Definition for wound (3 of 5)

wind

1
[ noun wind, Literary wahynd; verb wind ]
/ noun wɪnd, Literary waɪnd; verb wɪnd /

noun

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

to catch the scent or odor of game.

Origin of wind

1
before 900; Middle English (noun), Old English; cognate with Dutch, German Wind, Old Norse vindr, Gothic winds, Latin ventus

SYNONYMS FOR wind

1 Wind, air, zephyr, breeze, blast, gust refer to a quantity of air set in motion naturally. Wind applies to any such air in motion, blowing with whatever degree of gentleness or violence. Air, usually poetical, applies to a very gentle motion of the air. Zephyr, also poetical, refers to an air characterized by its soft, mild quality. A breeze is usually a cool, light wind. Blast and gust apply to quick, forceful winds of short duration; blast implies a violent rush of air, often a cold one, whereas a gust is little more than a flurry.
16 flatulence.

Definition for wound (4 of 5)

Origin of wind

2
before 900; Middle English winden, Old English windan; cognate with Dutch, German winden, Old Norse vinda, Gothic -windan; akin to wend, wander

Definition for wound (5 of 5)

wind

3
[ wahynd, wind ]
/ waɪnd, wɪnd /

verb (used with object), wind·ed or wound, wind·ing.

to blow (a horn, a blast, etc.).
to sound by blowing.
to signal or direct by blasts of the horn or the like.

Origin of wind

3
1375–1425; late Middle English; special use of wind1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for wound

British Dictionary definitions for wound (1 of 5)

wound

1
/ (wuːnd) /

noun

any break in the skin or an organ or part as the result of violence or a surgical incision
an injury to plant tissue
any injury or slight to the feelings or reputation

verb

to inflict a wound or wounds upon (someone or something)

Derived Forms

Word Origin for wound

Old English wund; related to Old Frisian wunde, Old High German wunta (German Wunde), Old Norse und, Gothic wunds

British Dictionary definitions for wound (2 of 5)

wound

2
/ (waʊnd) /

verb

the past tense and past participle of wind 2

British Dictionary definitions for wound (3 of 5)

wind

1
/ (wɪnd) /

noun

verb (tr)

Derived Forms

windless, adjectivewindlessly, adverbwindlessness, noun

Word Origin for wind

Old English wind; related to Old High German wint, Old Norse vindr, Gothic winds, Latin ventus

British Dictionary definitions for wound (4 of 5)

wind

2
/ (waɪnd) /

verb winds, winding or wound

noun

See also wind down, wind up

Derived Forms

windable, adjective

Word Origin for wind

Old English windan; related to Old Norse vinda, Old High German wintan (German winden)

British Dictionary definitions for wound (5 of 5)

wind

3
/ (waɪnd) /

verb winds, winding, winded or wound

(tr) poetic to blow (a note or signal) on (a horn, bugle, etc)

Word Origin for wind

C16: special use of wind 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for wound

wound

[ wōōnd ]

n.

Injury to a part or tissue of the body, especially one caused by physical trauma and characterized by tearing, cutting, piercing, or breaking of the tissue.
An incision.

Related forms

wound v.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for wound

wind

[ wĭnd ]

A current of air, especially a natural one that moves along or parallel to the ground, moving from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure. Surface wind is measured by anemometers or its effect on objects, such as trees. The large-scale pattern of winds on Earth is governed primarily by differences in the net solar radiation received at the Earth's surface, but it is also influenced by the Earth's rotation, by the distribution of continents and oceans, by ocean currents, and by topography. On a local scale, the differences in rate of heating and cooling of land versus bodies of water greatly affect wind formation. Prevailing global winds are classified into three major belts in the Northern Hemisphere and three corresponding belts in the Southern Hemisphere. The trade winds blow generally east to west toward a low-pressure zone at the equator throughout the region from 30° north to 30° south of the equator. The westerlies blow from west to east in the temperate mid-latitude regions (from 30° to 60° north and south of the equator), and the polar easterlies blow from east to west out of high-pressure areas in the polar regions. See also Beaufort scale chinook foehn monsoon Santa Ana.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with wound (1 of 2)

wound


see lick one's wounds; rub in (salt into a wound).

Idioms and Phrases with wound (2 of 2)

wind


In addition to the idioms beginning with wind

  • wind down
  • wind up

also see:

  • before the wind
  • break wind
  • get wind of
  • gone with the wind
  • ill wind
  • in the wind
  • like greased lightning (the wind)
  • sail close to the wind
  • second wind
  • something in the wind
  • straw in the wind
  • take the wind out of one's sails
  • three sheets to the wind
  • throw caution to the winds
  • twist in the wind
  • way the wind blows
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.