circumambulate

[ sur-kuhm-am-byuh-leyt ]
/ ˌsɜr kəmˈæm byəˌleɪt /

verb (used with or without object), cir·cum·am·bu·lat·ed, cir·cum·am·bu·lat·ing.

to walk or go about or around, especially ceremoniously.

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Origin of circumambulate

First recorded in 1650–60, circumambulate is from the Late Latin word circumambulātus (past participle of circumambulāre). See circum-, ambulate

OTHER WORDS FROM circumambulate

cir·cum·am·bu·la·tion, nouncir·cum·am·bu·la·tor, nouncir·cum·am·bu·la·to·ry, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for circumambulate

  • Is this me, around whom children ran, as they would about a pillar or a monument, and thought it exercise to circumambulate?

    Arthur O'Leary|Charles James Lever
  • They kneel, clasp their hands, circumambulate the Buddha and file out.

    The Buddha|Paul Carus
  • Do thou, therefore, circumambulate that great hero cheerfully.

British Dictionary definitions for circumambulate

circumambulate
/ (ˌsɜːkəmˈæmbjʊˌleɪt) /

verb

to walk around (something)
(intr) to avoid the point

Derived forms of circumambulate

circumambulation, nouncircumambulator, nouncircumambulatory, adjective

Word Origin for circumambulate

C17: from Late Latin circum- + ambulāre to walk
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012