Clarendon

[klar-uh n-duh n]
noun
  1. Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of,1609–74, British statesman and historian.
  2. Council of, the ecumenical council (1164) occasioned by the opposition of Thomas à Becket to Henry II.
  3. (lowercase) Printing. a condensed form of printing type, like roman in outline but with thicker serifs.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for clarendon

Contemporary Examples of clarendon

  • Murdoch fits Clarendon's description of Cromwell, updated by David Chandler to describe Napoleon, as "a great, bad man."

    The Daily Beast logo
    The Rupert I Know

    Conrad Black

    December 17, 2008

  • Claus and Cosima had lost access to their Rhode Island estate, Clarendon Court.

    The Daily Beast logo
    I Helped Save Claus von Bulow

    Andrea Reynolds

    December 9, 2008

  • And I had one more asset that Cosima loved: golden retrievers, seven of them; her dogs had had to stay behind at Clarendon Court.

    The Daily Beast logo
    I Helped Save Claus von Bulow

    Andrea Reynolds

    December 9, 2008

Historical Examples of clarendon


British Dictionary definitions for clarendon

clarendon

noun
  1. printing a style of boldface roman type

Word Origin for clarendon

C20: named after the Clarendon Press at Oxford University

Clarendon

1
noun
  1. a village near Salisbury in S England: site of a council held by Henry II in 1164 that produced a code of laws (the Constitutions of Clarendon) defining relations between church and state

Clarendon

2
noun
  1. 1st Earl of, title of Edward Hyde. 1609–74, English statesman and historian; chief adviser to Charles II (1660–67); author of History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England (1704–07)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for clarendon
n.

a thickened Roman type face, 1845, evidently named for the Clarendon press at Oxford University, which was set up 1713 in the Clarendon Building, named for university Chancellor Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper