clinker

1
[kling-ker]
See more synonyms for clinker on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. a mass of incombustible matter fused together, as in the burning of coal.
  2. a hard Dutch brick, used especially for paving.
  3. a partially vitrified mass of brick.
  4. the scale of oxide formed on iron during forging.
  5. Geology. a mass of vitrified material ejected from a volcano.
verb (used without object)
  1. to form clinkers in burning.

Origin of clinker

1
First recorded in 1635–45, clinker is from the Dutch word klinker kind of brick, slag

clinker

2
[kling-ker]
noun
  1. a person or thing that clinks.

Origin of clinker

2
First recorded in 1680–90; clink1 + -er1

clinker

3
[kling-ker]
noun Slang.
  1. a wrong note in a musical performance.
  2. any mistake or error.
  3. something that is a failure; a product of inferior quality.
  4. British. someone or something wonderful or exceedingly well-liked.

Origin of clinker

3
First recorded in 1830–40; special use of clinker2
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for clinker

Historical Examples of clinker


British Dictionary definitions for clinker

clinker

noun
  1. the ash and partially fused residues from a coal-fired furnace or fire
  2. Also called: clinker brick a hard brick used as a paving stone
  3. a partially vitrified brick or mass of brick
  4. slang, mainly US something of poor quality, such as a film
  5. US and Canadian slang a mistake or fault, esp a wrong note in music
verb
  1. (intr) to form clinker during burning

Word Origin for clinker

C17: from Dutch klinker a type of brick, from obsolete klinckaerd, literally: something that clinks (referring to the sound produced when one was struck), from klinken to clink 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for clinker
n.

"mass of slag," 1769, from klincard (1640s), a type of paving brick made in Holland, from Dutch klinkaerd, from klinken "to ring" (as it does when struck), of imitative origin. Also "a clinch-nail;" hence clinker-built (1769). The meaning "stupid mistake" is first recorded 1950 in American English; originally (1942) "a wrong note in music."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper