cogitate

[koj-i-teyt]
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verb (used with object), cog·i·tat·ed, cog·i·tat·ing.
  1. to think about; devise: to cogitate a scheme.

Origin of cogitate

1555–65; < Latin cōgitātus (past participle of cōgitāre), equivalent to co- co- + agitātus; see agitate
Related formscog·i·tat·ing·ly, adverbcog·i·ta·tor, nounpre·cog·i·tate, verb, pre·cog·i·tat·ed, pre·cog·i·tat·ing.

Synonyms for cogitate

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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for cogitate

Contemporary Examples of cogitate

Historical Examples of cogitate

  • Father Brown seemed to cogitate; he lifted a little whitebait on his fork.

  • But he did not stop to cogitate either one way or the other.

    The Rhodesian

    Gertrude Page

  • Here in Topeka there was nothing to do but cogitate and reflect.

  • I often cogitate over what accident must have befallen Jacob Canfield.

    Two Wonderful Detectives

    Harlan Page Halsey

  • Let me see; let me think, reflect, cogitate, tickle the thinker.

    The Varmint

    Owen Johnson


British Dictionary definitions for cogitate

cogitate

verb
  1. to think deeply about (a problem, possibility, etc); ponder
Derived Formscogitatingly, adverbcogitation, nouncogitator, noun

Word Origin for cogitate

C16: from Latin cōgitāre, from co- (intensive) + agitāre to turn over, agitate
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for cogitate
v.

late 16c., from Latin cogitatus, past participle of cogitare "to think" (see cogitation). Related: Cogitated; cogitating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper