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cognate

[ kog-neyt ]
/ ˈkɒg neɪt /
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See synonyms for: cognate / cognates on Thesaurus.com

adjective

related by birth; of the same parentage, descent, etc.
Linguistics. descended from the same language or form: such cognate languages as French and Spanish.
allied or similar in nature or quality.

noun

a person or thing cognate with another.
a cognate word: The English word cold is a cognate of German kalt.

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Origin of cognate

1635–45; <Latin cognātus, equivalent to co-co- + -gnātus (past participle of gnāscī, nāscī to be born)

OTHER WORDS FROM cognate

cog·nate·ness, nouncog·nat·ic [kog-nat-ik], /kɒgˈnæt ɪk/, adjectivenon·cog·nate, adjective, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for cognate

British Dictionary definitions for cognate

cognate
/ (ˈkɒɡneɪt) /

adjective

akin; relatedcognate languages
related by blood or descended from a common maternal ancestorCompare agnate
cognate object grammar a noun functioning as the object of a verb to which it is etymologically related, as in think a thought or sing a song

noun

something that is cognate with something else

Derived forms of cognate

cognately, adverbcognateness, nouncognation, noun

Word Origin for cognate

C17: from Latin cognātus, from co- same + gnātus born, variant of nātus, past participle of nāscī to be born
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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